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European Union

European Union

The Future of Families to 2030

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, December 22, 2011
Abstract in English: 
Since the 1960s the family in the OECD area has undergone significant transformation. In many countries, the extended family has all but disappeared, and the traditional two-parent family has become much less widespread as divorce rates, re-marriages, cohabitation, single parenthood and same-sex partnerships have all increased. With rising migration, cultures and values have become more diverse, with some ethnic minorities evolving as parallel family cultures while others intermingle with mainstream cultures through mixed-race marriages. Families have seen more mothers take up work in the labour market, their adolescents spend longer and longer in education and training, and the elderly members of the family live longer and, increasingly, alone. The repercussions of these changes on housing, pensions, health and long-term care, on labour markets, education and public finances, have been remarkable. Recent demographic projections perfromed by many OECD countries suggest that the next 20 years are likely to see a continuation and even acceleration of changes in household and family structures. In particular, the numbers and shares of single-adult and single-parent households are expected to increase significantly, as is the number of couples without children. This report explores likely future changes in family and household structures in OECD countries; identifies what appear to be the main forces shaping the family landscape between now and 2030; discusses the longer-term challenges for policy arising from those expected changes; and on the basis of the three subsequent thematic chapters, suggests policy options for managing the challenges on a sustainable basis.
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The Europe 2020 Strategy: Can It Maintain the EU's Competitiveness in the World?

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, September 4, 2012
Abstract in English: 
Launched in March 2010 by the European Commission, the Europe 2020 strategy aims at achieving “smart, sustainable and inclusive” growth. This growth is intended to be driven by three sets of engines: knowledge and innovation, a greener and more efficient use of resources and higher employment combined with social and territorial cohesion. This CEPS report takes an in-depth look at the Europe 2020 strategy and the goals it sets for the EU, with the aim of shedding light on the question of whether the strategy will succeed in fostering the global competitiveness of the European Union. While finding that the Europe 2020 strategy identifies the right key indicators for its targets, the authors advise that it should be revised in several important respects and conclude with relevant policy steps to foster the future capability of European economies and their prosperity.
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Benchmarking Working Europe 2013

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Publication date: 
Monday, April 1, 2013
Abstract in English: 
Widening economic and social gaps among EU member states, as well as among different groups and categories of citizens within society, are not only placing in jeopardy the future of Social Europe but threatening to undermine also the whole project of European integration. The post-2008 recession and debt crisis, helped along by EU leaders’ obstinate clinging to the failing remedies of fiscal austerity, have accelerated the disenchantment of millions of European citizens with the half-century-old project to build and consolidate a European Union. This is one of the most striking conclusions of the ETUI’s Benchmarking Working Europe report for 2013.
Benchmarking Working Europe is one of the ETUI’s regularly appearing flagship publications. Issued annually since 2002, the report offers an alternative perspective on EU developments. Using publicly accessible data, it reveals what is actually going on behind the EU social and economic affairs headlines. After last year’s issue focused on growing inequality in Europe, this year’s Benchmarking Working Europe report will demonstrate by means of hard-hitting graphs and cogent arguments that Europe is, rather than converging, actually drifting apart in numerous respects.
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Future Global Shocks. Improving Risk Governance

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Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2011
Abstract in English: 
Recent global shocks, such as the 2008 financial crisis, have driven policy makers and industry strategists to re-examine how to prepare for and respond to events that can begin locally and propagate around the world with devastating effects on society and the economy. This report considers how the growing interconnectedness in the global economy could create the conditions and vectors for rapid and widespread disruptions. It looks at examples of hazards and threats that emerge from the financial world, cyberspace, biological systems and even the solar system, to reflect on what strategic capacities are called for to improve assessment, mapping, modelling, response and resilience to such large scale risks.
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The G-20: A Pathway to Effective Multilateralism?

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Publication date: 
Friday, April 1, 2011
Abstract in English: 
The emergence of the G-20 as the primary forum of world economic cooperation is one of the most significant developments in global governance in the twenty-first century. It is linked to the ongoing transformation of the world order as well as the recognised need to find global solutions to problems which are progressively acquiring global dimensions. Against this background, the emergence of the G-20 has been seen as providing further evidence of the increasingly multipolar order and signalling the end of the West’s domination of the world economy and politics. On the other hand, it has been viewed as a response to the increasing interdependence forged by globalisation. Relatedly, its development has been associated with a poorly functioning global governance system.
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OECD Compendium of Productivity Indicators 2012

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Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, November 1, 2013
Abstract in English: 
This document presents an overview of recent trends in productivity level and growth in OECD countries, based on a large set of indicators. It also highlights the measurement issues involved in compiling indicators used for the analysis of issues related to productivity.
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Towards a Green Economy in Europe: EU Environmental Policy Targets and Objectives 2010-2050

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Publication date: 
Monday, July 1, 2013
Abstract in English: 
The 'green economy' has emerged as a priority in policy debate in recent years. But what does the concept mean in practice and how can decision-makers measure progress towards this strategic goal ? This report provides some answers, presenting a detailed overview of the key objectives and targets in EU environmental policy and legislation for the period 2010-2050. It focuses on selected environmental and resource policy areas, specifically: energy; greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and ozone-depleting substances; air quality and air pollution; transport sector emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants; waste; water; sustainable consumption and production (SCP); chemicals; biodiversity and land use.
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Economic Policy Reforms: Going for Growth 2013

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Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, February 15, 2013
Abstract in English: 
Going for Growth builds on OECD expertise on structural policy reforms and economic performance to provide policymakers with a set of concrete recommendations on reform areas identified as priorities for sustained growth. The OECD has identified reform recommendations to boost real incomes and employment through the Going for Growth analysis for each OECD country since 2005 and, more recently, for the BRIICS. This benchmarking exercise provides a tool for governments to reflect on policy reforms that affect their citizens’ long-term living standards. Since the 2009 Pittsburgh Summit, Going for Growth has contributed to the G20 regular work programme to achieve Strong, Sustainable and Balanced Growth, notably through the so called Mutual Assessment Process. For each country, five policy priorities are identified based on their ability to improve long term material living standards through higher productivity and employment. The priorities broadly cover product and labour market regulations; education and training; tax and benefit systems; trade and investment rules; and innovation policies. This issue reviews the progress made on previous recommendations and identifies new priorities for the near term. It also looks at the potential impact of Going for Growth policy recommendations on public policy goals other than GDP growth.
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The Future of Europe's Economy: Disaster or Deliverance?

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Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, September 18, 2013
Abstract in English: 
Europe’s economy is finally showing tentative signs of stabilising. But does this mark the start of a robust recovery, or is it, in the language of the markets, a ‘dead cat bounce’? The Centre for European Reform asked four leading European economists to predict how things would look in 2020. Their answers differ sharply. The future of the European project will to a large extent depend on which of the four authors is most right. If the eurozone as a whole, and its debtor states in particular, suffer prolonged stagnation and funding crises, popular faith in European integration could be hit hard. Aside from casting doubt over the future of the euro, the damage to the EU’s single market, perhaps Europe’s biggest economic asset, and to relations between member-states would be considerable. Conversely, if the eurozone stages a sustained economic recovery, and the currency union’s debtor countries are able to honour their debt burdens while engineering a bounce-back in living standards, the outlook for the euro (and the EU more generally) will be much brighter.
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The European Financial Crisis: Constitutional Aspects and Implications

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Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, September 19, 2012
Abstract in English: 
With its provisions on the EMU, the Maastricht Treaty introduced a new, ’macroeconomic’ layer into the European economic constitution. The Maastricht layer of the European economic constitution was based on the following principles: exclusive competence of the EU in monetary policy in the euro area; price stability as the primary objective of Europeanized monetary policy; independence of the ECB and national central banks; Member State sovereignty in fiscal and economic policy with the Union accomplishing a mere coordinating task; Member State fiscal liability as the reverse of their fiscal sovereignty; and primacy of price stability pursued by Europeanized monetary policy over national fiscal-policy objectives. The ongoing euro-area crisis is a constitutional crisis, too. The European responses to the crisis include, on the one hand, emergency measures and stability mechanisms, and, on the other hand, strengthening European economic governance. As a consequence of these responses, the central Maastricht principles of the European economic constitution are teetering. However, the present constitutional crisis should not merely be conceived in economic terms. It extends to the political and social dimensions; it also affects democracy and transparency, as well as social values and rights.
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