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Defence

Recasting EU civilian crisis management

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Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Abstract in English: 
This Report explores how EU civilian crisis management (CCM) has evolved over the past decade, showing how the concept and activity have been transformed by changes in the international security environment as well as in the EU’s institutional setting. Security challenges such as organised crime, illegal migration or terrorism have made the traditional divide between internal and external security increasingly irrelevant. New types of CCM actors have thus emerged, in the field of Justice and Home Affairs in particular, that have de facto embraced crisis management in response to new threats. This publication seeks to identify the challenges as well as the opportunities that these changes present for CCM, and examines inter alia how EU CCM actors and policies have adapted to the new environment and how they can best serve the Union’s strategic priorities as identified by the EU Global Strategy.
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91
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After the EU Global Strategy – Building resilience

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Monday, May 29, 2017
Abstract in English: 
As well as introducing new decisions and actions in the field of security and defence, the EU Global Strategy (EUGS) stresses the imperative to build resilience in the EU neighbouring countries and surrounding regions.
As the EUGS approaches its first anniversary, and shortly before the release of a Joint Communication on resilience by the EEAS and the Commission, this volume, the second in the EUISS post-EUGS series, seeks to shed more light on the different definitions of the concept and how these may be applied in specific functional and geographic areas. It aims to clarify not only the meaning of the term but also its policy implications in the wider security context, showing how resilience needs be understood as a dynamic process involving a number of EU policies, external partners and local players.
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98
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Permanent Structured Cooperation: what’s in a name?

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Monday, November 13, 2017
Abstract in English: 
Permanent Structured Cooperation (PeSCo), the so-called ‘sleeping beauty’ of EU defence, is awake. Still barely predictable only a year ago, PeSCo is an ambitious, binding and inclusive legal framework aimed at incentivising defence cooperation among member states. PeSCo is based on binding commitments between member states that could promote increased defence spending, improve force commitments for EU operations and stimulate European defence equipment programmes. In addition to the regular assessment of these commitments, PeSCo will also house a number of concrete projects designed to improve the effectiveness of EU military operations and to sustain European capability development. Taken together, these elements are designed to potentially shape national mindsets and practices in defence through a structured framework at the EU level.
Elaborating on the likely form and extent of PeSCo, this Chaillot Paper not only sketches out the historical metamorphosis of PeSCo but it also looks more specifically at how it could change the operational and capability development dynamics of EU defence cooperation. The paper is not primarily occupied with questions about its finalité politique, but it is rather an analytical guide to assist experts and lay readers alike navigate the major operational and capability issues at stake.
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71
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EYE report 2018: Speak up Europe! 100 ideas for a better future

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Publication date: 
Sunday, July 15, 2018
Abstract in English: 
This is the report from the 2018 European Youth Event (EYE). It covers a wide range of topics and issues, organised around 5 main axes:
-Young and Old: How to ensure the Digital evolution will work for a fairer society and to adapt the EU to this changing environment
-Rich and Poor: Working for a more equal society (in terms of revenues, employment, gender...)
-Apart and Together: Working for a stronger Europe and promoting solidarity in and outside the EU
-Safe and Dangerous: Safety in the age of digital revolution and increasingly turbulent world
-Local and Global: Tackling climate change and working towards sustainable development
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43
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Defence and National Security Strategic Review 2017

Title Original Language: 
Revue Stratégique de Défense et de Sécurité Nationale 2017
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En considérant l’ensemble des risques, menaces et opportunités pour notre pays, deux problématiques ont structuré notre réflexion :
- La France ne peut pas, bien entendu, faire face seule et partout à ces défis. Notre autonomie, que nous souhaitons la plus complète possible, est réelle mais relative dans un nombre croissant de domaines. Il convient donc d’être lucide sur les priorités qui s’imposent à nous, en raison de la proximité géographique des menaces, ou de leur impact sur notre communauté nationale. Nos partenaires, européens et américains, sont indispensables pour faire face à ces défis.
- Nous avons également des intérêts globaux, qui découlent de notre statut au sein des instances multilatérales, de notre présence mondiale (en particulier outre-mer et dans notre zone économique exclusive) ainsi que de la contraction géographique liée aux interdépendances induites par la mondialisation des échanges, des flux et des technologies.
Dans ce contexte, la responsabilité de la France repose sur une singularité stratégique objective. Seul pays européen (après le Brexit) membre permanent du Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies et puissance nucléaire, membre fondateur de l’Union européenne et de l’OTAN, dotée d’un modèle d’armée complet et d’emploi, la France doit maintenir une double ambition : préserver son autonomie stratégique et construire une Europe plus robuste, pour faire face à la multiplication des défis communs.
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Sunday, October 15, 2017
Abstract in English: 
Weighing up all the risks, threats and opportunities for France, two main issues underpin the work in this review:
- France clearly cannot address all these challenges on its own. Our national autonomy is real and should be as comprehensive as possible, but it is limited within a growing number of fields. This calls for a clear-sighted approach to priorities based on the geographical proximity of threats and on the interests of our national community. France’s European and American partners are essential for facing these challenges.
- France also has global interests. These relate to its status within multilateral organisations and its presence around the world (in particular in its overseas territories and exclusive economic zone), as well as the fact that the world is shrinking as globalised technologies and flows of goods and people generate more interdependence.
Within this context, its responsibility is based on its unique situation in objective terms. France is the only EU country (post-Brexit) that is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, a nuclear power, a founding member of the European Union and NATO, and that retains a full-spectrum and engaged military. As such, its ambition must be twofold: to preserve its strategic autonomy and to build a stronger Europe to face the growing number of common challenges.
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100
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The Global Innovation Sweepstakes: A Quest to Win the Future

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Publication date: 
Tuesday, June 26, 2018
Abstract in English: 
The world is on the cusp of an unprecedented technological revolution, one that will have far-reaching social, economic, and geostrategic consequences.How the United States and other major actors position themselves as innovators and adaptors of emerging technologies will determine their economic fate and geostrategic standing.
This report seeks to answer the fundamental questions raised by the unfolding technological revolution.
The key recommendations in this report deal not just with the potential problems between states, but also address some of the inequities that are growing within societies due in part to emerging technologies.
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108
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Cyber Resilience Playbook for Public- Private Collaboration

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Friday, January 12, 2018
Abstract in English: 
States have taken a variety of approaches to securing their digital domains. These policy approaches share a significant commonality: success depends on collaboration between the public and private sectors.
However, effective collaboration is uniquely difficult in the domain of cybersecurity. Cyberthreats are complex, with an ever-expanding and exposed surface for malicious actors to exploit. Each new innovation brings with it new and sometimes unexpected vulnerabilities.
Despite these challenges, advancing cyber resilience requires the public and private sectors to collaborate in new and innovative ways. This Playbook is recommended for use by the public and private sectors, together, as a tool to facilitate discussions on building the institutions, frameworks, policies, norms and processes necessary to support collaboration in this vital space.
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72
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Russia’s New State Armament Programme Implications for the Russian Armed Forces and Military Capabilities to 2027

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Thursday, May 10, 2018
Abstract in English: 
In this paper, we consider the main objectives of GPV 2027 (gosudarstvennaia programma vooruzheniia, Russian for "10-year state armament programme") and examine whether Russia’s financial and defence-industrial capabilities are sufficient to meet them. We then consider how the Russian armed forces are likely to be equipped by the mid-2020s, should the main objectives of GPV 2027 be achieved. Although the programme itself is classified, enough details have entered the public domain – for instance, through statements by officials, news reports, federal budgets and draft budgets – for educated inferences to be made as to its broad contours, likely priorities and strategic direction. Such assessments are the basis of this paper.
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42
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Who Said What? The Security Challenges of Modern Disinformation

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, February 22, 2018
Abstract in English: 
The reach and speed of the Internet and social media have escalated the potential impact of disinformation. Increases in data transmission capacity coupled with a shift towards programmatic advertising have resulted in a precipitous decrease in the ability of traditional journalism to mediate the quality of public information. Conventional journalism has been partially displaced by a torrent of data from an infinite number of originators. Within that torrent is a current of lies and distortions that threatens the integrity of public discourse, debate and democracy.
Raised public awareness is needed to distinguish the real from the false. There are many ways for governments and organisations to counter the threat, but there is no guarantee that even effective counter campaigns can defeat the high volume flow of malicious communications.
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124
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UK-EU security cooperation after Brexit

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Publication date: 
Wednesday, March 21, 2018
Abstract in English: 
In an increasingly interconnected world, EU Member States have sought ways to work together against cross-border threats, including organised crime, terrorism and cybercrime, through different agencies and cooperative measures. This report examines the UK’s interaction with those measures after Brexit, and the prospects for future security cooperation between the UK and the EU.
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59
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