RSS:

Newsletter subscribe:

Economy

Foresight Conference 2019 Report : Society 4.0

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, November 15, 2019
Abstract in English: 
Foresight Conference 2019 is organised by the Centre for Strategic Futures (CSF) in Singapore. The conference will be held on 25 and 26 July 2019, with the theme “Society 4.0”. This is CSF’s fifth Foresight Conference, which brings thought leaders and practitioners from different backgrounds together to explore emerging issues of global significance.
We loosely use the term “Society 4.0” to mean the society that will be and is already being shaped by the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR). Just as the First Industrial Revolution mechanised production via water and steam power and consequently reshaped economic, political and social structures, the 4IR is likely to have an equal or even more disruptive impact on the texture of society.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
38
Share: 

Lending to European Households and Non-Financial Corporations: Growth and Trends

Title Original Language: 
Lending to European Households and Non-Financial Corporations: Growth and Trends
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, November 8, 2019
Abstract in English: 
The ECRI Statistical Package 2019 provides data on outstanding credit granted by monetary-financial institutions (MFIs) to households and non-financial corporations (NFCs) for the period from 1995 to 2018. Credit volumes and annual growth rates are broken down by sector and credit type to enable detailed insights into credit market developments over time and across countries. It comprises 45 countries including the EU Member States, EU candidate and EFTA countries as well as the US, Canada, Japan, Australia, Russia, Mexico and Saudi Arabia. 2018, loans to EU households and non-financial corporations(NFC) increased by 2.7%, the second consecutive year of the expansion.For the fourth year in a row, total loans in New Member States (NMS) grew faster than in old Member States (EU-15). Compared to the previous year, the total loans growth rate in 2018 accelerated from 2.2% to 2.7% in EU-15, while it slowed from 5.9% to 3.5% in NMS. Between 2017 and 2018, household loans increased by 2.8% and non-financial corporations (NFC) loans increased by2.6%. Total household loans grew most in in Slovakia (+11%), Romania (+9%) and Lithuania (+8%), while the largest contractions were registered in Cyprus (-31%), Greece (-7%) and Latvia (-5%). Finland (+19%), Hungary (+19%) and Luxembourg (+11%) were amongst the Member States with the largest growth rates in NFC loans. In turn, significant reductions were registered inalia, Russia, Mexico and Saudi Arabia.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
11
Country Original Language: 
Share: 
Topics: 

Future of Europe

Title Original Language: 
Future of Europa
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, November 1, 2019
Abstract in English: 
A decade after the crisis that came close to destroying it, the Eurozone remains fragile. Fiscal indiscipline, a key cause of the crisis, remains a relevant issue. Progress has been made to make the banking system safer, but much more is required to contain risk. Eurozone governance remains weak. This paper argues that six key steps are required to refashion the Eurozone into a robust monetary union capable of dealing with unexpected shocks in the future. These steps are: 1. Subsidiarity should be rigorously applied to straighten the existing muddled governance structures. 2. Banking Union needs to be completed to break the doom loop between banks and governments. 3. Pan-European banks and fully integrated financial mar-kets offer the best solution to absorb national disturbances. Implicit protectionism – through regulations and support for national champions – should not be accepted. 4. The responsibility for fiscal discipline must lie where the budget authority is exercised: at the national level. 5. The no-bailout clause is the best protection against fiscal indiscipline. It should be formally restored. 6. Some countries with large public debts remain vulnerable market sentiment fluctuations. However, there are ways to reduce these debts without any transfer or mutual guarantees.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
28
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

OECD Economic Outlook

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, November 21, 2019
Abstract in English: 
The OECD Economic Outlook is the OECD's twice-yearly analysis of the major economic trends and prospects for the next two years. The Outlook puts forward a consistent set of projections for output, employment, prices, fiscal and current account balances.
Coverage is provided for all OECD member countries as well as for selected non-member countries. This issue includes a general assessment, a series of focus notes on selected macroeconomic and structural issues, and a chapter summarising developments and providing projections for each individual country.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
220
Share: 

Promoting Pathways to Decent Work

Title Original Language: 
Promoting Pathways to Decent Work
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, October 16, 2019
Abstract in English: 
This synthesis report presents the main findings from a multi-year research project conducted by the ILO to assess how income support and active labour market policies (ALMPs) can come together to improve the employ-ment and life trajectories of workers, particularly in emerging and developing countries. The research question was derived from an earlier ILO project entitled “Active labour market policies in Latin America and the Caribbean”, specifically from the project’s conclusion that, while ALMPs are indeed able to improve workers’ labour market prospects, the success of such interventions hinges on their accessibility. In several cases, a critical missing piece seemed to be adequate income support, which appeared to be a prerequisite for workers in the region to participate fully in activation programmes. The purpose of the present report is thus to shed light on how approaches based on a combination of income support and active support can be used to respond effectively to contemporary labour market challenges in developing and emerging economies.The report is being issued at a time when governments are faced with the challenge of creating better quality employment opportunities in a world where rapid changes are compounding long standing labour market problems. In this respect, the report shows that the policy combinations studied can make a difference, even in the challenging context of contem-porary labour markets. The new evidence presented indicates that the joint implementation of ALMPs and income support measures, if organized properly, can achieve the dual aim of protecting workers while improving their access to decent work. Multiple policy combinations are possible, and so it is important to identify the factors that determine the success (or otherwise) of such an integrated approach, particularly in emerging and developing countries, where labour ma number of methods, including a literature review, a cross-country map-ping, a comparative macroeconomic study, and two case studies based on microeconomic impact evaluations and qualitative research.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

Policy Pathways for the New Economy Shaping Economic Policyin the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Title Original Language: 
Policy Pathways for the New Economy Shaping Economic Policyin the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019
Abstract in English: 
This white paper is the outcome of a set of international, multi-stakeholder dialogues organized by the World Economic Forum’s Platform for Shaping the Future of the New Economy and Society under the umbrella of the Second Dialogue Series on New Economic Frontiers. The First Dialogue Series was convened between September 2018 and January 2019 (https://www.weforum.org/whitepapers/dialogue-series-on-new-economic-and-social-frontiers-shaping-the-new-economy-in-the-fourth-industrial-revolution). This second series engages the Platform’s Global Future Councils on the New Economic Agenda and the New Social Contract, representing views from business, government, civil society and the research community. It identifies some of the most urgent challenges at the intersection of globalization, technology, economics and society, and explores a range of potential interventions to address them. As opposed to the First Dialogue Series, which considered a broad range of public- and private-sector led solutions, this Series focuses entirely on interventions in the public policy space, in the areas of labour, innovation and tax policy. As a key output of the learning created, this white paper draws upon discussion contributions by leaders and experts who engaged in the Dialogue through a series of virtual calls between May and August 2019. It also includes the latest thinking from international organizations, academic researchers, think tanks, businesses and other stakeholders. It aims to develop consensus towards a common narrative on the new economic and social context and objectively identify emerging response options for policy makers. The white paper is intended to be a resource for governments, business and other stakeholders interested in furthering economic and social progress in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

A personal readout of the three ESPAS reports (2012, 2015 and 2019)

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Saturday, September 14, 2019
Abstract in English: 
In this summary, Dr Franck Debié outlines his views of the key findings of the three ESPAS reports (2012, 2015, 2019) on long-term trends to 2030 for the Ideas Network 2030.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
8
Share: 

Ideas and Perspectives: Priorities 2030

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, September 13, 2019
Abstract in English: 
In this short presentation, Dr Franck Debié, Director of the Library and the Knowledge services in the European Parliament, Associate Professor of Geopolitics at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris (Paris Sciences et Lettres University), Member of the Steering Committee of the European System for Policy Analysis and Strategy (ESPAS) outlines his view of the key findings of the three ESPAS reports (2012, 2015, 2019) on long-term trends to 2030 for the Ideas Network 2030, an Oxford based network regrouping policy-makers, business actors and researchers. The discussion took place on 14 September 2019. In his conclusions he stressed that: 'the successive ESPAS reports help us to progressively narrow our focus on those issues which will force Europeans to engage in a joint conversation on policy options for the future: the rise of China, climate change, aging and migration, digital disruption, and the growth of nationalism.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
36
Share: 

Work for a brighter future

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, January 22, 2019
Abstract in English: 
New forces are transforming the world of work. The transitions involved call for decisive action. Countless opportunities lie ahead to improve the quality of working lives, expand choice, close the gender gap, reverse the damages wreaked by global inequality, and much more. Yet none of this will happen by itself. Without decisive action we will be heading into a world that widens existing inequalities and uncertainties. Technological advances – artificial intelligence, automation and robotics – will create new jobs, but those who lose their jobs in this transition may be the least equipped to seize the new opportunities. Today’s skills will not match the jobs of tomorrow and newly acquired skills may quickly become obsolete. The greening of our economies will create millions of jobs as we adopt sustainable practices and clean technologies but other jobs will disappear as countries scale back their carbon- and resource-intensive industries. Changes in demographics are no less significant. Expanding youth populations in some parts of the world and ageing populations in others may place pressure on labour markets and social security systems, yet in these shifts lie new possibilities to afford care and inclusive, active societies. We need to seize the opportunities presented by these transformative changes to create a brighter future and deliver economic security, equal opportunity and social justice – and ultimately reinforce the fabric of our societies.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
78
Share: 

The future of work? Work of the future!

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, May 3, 2019
Abstract in English: 
We are used to thinking about artificial intelligence (AI) in the future tense, speculating how technological developments in this area will affect us. But if we spend too much time trying to figure out what to expect in the future, we risk not seeing that AI and robotisation have already started transforming our daily lives.
While historical evidence suggests that previous waves of automation have been overwhelmingly positive for the economy and society, AI is in a different league, with the potential to be much more disruptive. It builds upon other digital technologies but also brings about and amplifies major socioeconomic changes of its own.
What do recent technological developments in AI and robotisation mean for the economy, businesses and jobs? Should we be worried or excited? Which jobs will be destroyed and which new ones created? What should education systems, businesses, governments and social partners do to manage the coming transition successfully?
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
160
Share: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Economy