RSS:

Newsletter subscribe:

Employment

Towards a more resilient Europe post-coronavirus: Options to enhance the EU's resilience to structural risks

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, April 16, 2021
Abstract in English: 
The coronavirus crisis has underlined the need for the European Union (EU) to devote greater efforts to anticipatory governance, and to attempt to strengthen its resilience in the face of risks from both foreseeable and unforeseeable events. This paper builds further on an initial 'mapping' in mid-2020 of some 66 potential structural risks which could confront Europe over the coming decade, and a second paper last autumn which looked at the EU's capabilities to address 33 of those risks assessed as being more significant or likely, and at the various gaps in policy and instruments at the Union's disposal. Delving deeper in 25 specific areas, this new paper identifies priorities for building greater resilience within the Union system, drawing on the European Parliament's own resolutions and proposals made by other EU institutions, as well as by outside experts and stakeholders. In the process, it highlights some of the key constraints that will need to be addressed if strengthened resilience is to be achieved, as well as the opportunities that follow from such an approach.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Share: 

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Living with uncertainty

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020
Abstract in English: 
This Interim Report provides updates for G20 country projections made in the June 2020 issue of OECD Economic Outlook (Number 107).
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
18
Share: 

Towards a more resilient Europe post-coronavirus: Capabilities and gaps in the EU's capacity to address structural risks

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020
Abstract in English: 
The current coronavirus crisis emphasises the need for the European Union to devote more effort to anticipatory governance, notably through analysis of medium- and long-term global trends, as well as structured contingency planning and the stress-testing of existing and future policies. In order to contribute to reflection on and discussion about the implications of the coronavirus pandemic for EU policy-making, this paper builds on an initial 'mapping' of some 66 potential structural risks which could confront Europe over the coming decade. Taking 33 risks which are assessed as being more significant or likely, it looks first at the capabilities which the EU and its Member States already have to address those risks, and then looks at the various gaps in policy and instruments at the Union's disposal, suggesting possible approaches to overcome them in the short and medium terms.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
114
Share: 

Ten opportunities for Europe post-coronavirus: Exploring potential for progress in EU policy-making

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, July 15, 2020
Abstract in English: 
Whilst much commentary and analysis has understandably been focused on reaction to, and mitigation of, the immediate impact of the coronavirus crisis in Europe and worldwide, relatively little attention has been paid to areas of potential opportunity which the crisis may offer to improve policy for the future. This EPRS analysis looks at ten areas which may offer potential for progress, including working more closely together on health policy, using climate action to promote a sustainable recovery, re-thinking the world of work, future-proofing education, harnessing e-commerce and championing European values and multilateralism.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
28
Share: 

Towards a more resilient Europe post-coronavirus: An initial mapping of structural risks facing the EU

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, July 20, 2020
Abstract in English: 
The current coronavirus crisis emphasises the need for the European Union to devote more effort to anticipatory governance, notably through analysis of medium- and long-term global trends, as well as structured contingency planning and the stress-testing of existing and future policies. In order to contribute to reflection on, and discussion about, the implications of the coronavirus pandemic for EU policy-making, this paper offers an initial ‘mapping’ of some of the potential structural risks which could confront Europe over the coming decade, with 66 such risks analysed briefly in a series of short notes. The document then goes on to take a closer look at some of the more immediate risks to be considered in the near term and outlines possible EU action to prevent or mitigate them over the remainder of the 2019-24 institutional cycle.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
100
Share: 

Social Dialogue and the Future of Work

Title Original Language: 
Social Dialogue and the Future of Work
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, May 12, 2020
Abstract in English: 
Social dialogue, defined as “all types of negotiation and consultation, and also the exchange of information between or among, representatives of governments, employers and workers on issues of common interest relating to economic and social policy” has been long employed as a tool in the governance of work, with the objective of delivering sustainable economic growth, social justice and the kind of high-trust work relations that are not only valuable in themselves, but that can also improve business performance and increase workers’ share in rising profitability. It includes tripartite social dialogue, collective bargaining and workplace cooperation. Collective bargaining is defined in the ILO’s Collective Bargaining Convention, 1981 (No. 154), as “all negotiations which take place between an employer, a group of employers or one or more employers’ organisations, on the one hand, and one or more workers' organisations, on the other, for: (a) determining working conditions and terms of employment; and/or (b) regulating relations between employers and workers; and/or (c) regulating relations between employer or their organisations and a workers’ organisation or workers’ organisations.” Freedom of association and the effective right to collective bargaining are the preconditions for successful social dialogue.The ILO Global Commission on the Future of Work, which examined the transformations underway in the world of work, emphasized the need for decisive action. It considered that the collective representation of workers’ and employers’ organizations through social dialogue contributes to the public good and called for public policies that promote collective representation and social dialogue. “Collective representation and social dialogue provide the institutional capabilities needed to navigate future of work transitions [....] At company level, works councils, consultation and information arrangements and worker representation on boards are all proven mechanisms to manage the challenges of change and to allow people to exercise influence over their working lives. Collective bargaining is a fundamental right and a powerful tool for economic success and social equity, not least in times of transformational change. Tripartite social dialogue allows opportunity for the partners to the social contract to consider the broader societal issues that change brings and to guide policy responses. The ILO Centenary Declaration for the Future of Work adopted by the 108th (Centenary) International Labour Conference of the ILO states that “social dialogue contributes to the overall cohesion of societies and is crucial for a well-functioning and productive economy.” Social dialogue is not only a necessary tool for managing change and addressing the transformations underway; it also helps in addressing the long-standing problems we already face. Work in the informal economy, for example, still accounts for more than 60 per cent of the world’s employed population, exceeding 90 per cent in parts of Africa and Asia. Even in the formal sector, some workers may remain trapped in jobs that offer barely subsistence-level wages and inadequate social protection in return for long hours of hard labour in dangerous conditions. In moving forward to address the challenges of the future, we also need to solve the problems we already face by strengthening social dialogue institutions and enhancing the inclusiveness of collective representation at all levels.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
20
Share: 

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion 4.0: A toolkit for leaders to accelerate social progress in the future of work

Title Original Language: 
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion 4.0: A toolkit for leaders to accelerate social progress in the future of work
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2020
Abstract in English: 
The start of the decade has seen a convergence of three major trends: the accelerated use of Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies in the midst of the pandemic, job market disruptions to both remote work and work requiring physical presence, and a wide-ranging call for greater inclusivity, equity and social justice. Now more than ever, in the midst of such sweeping change, organizations have an opportunity to embed greater diversity, equity and inclusion. Societal change and the need for future creativity and innovation demand that business consider the best use of new technologies in enabling this journey. Successful organizations are powered by the diverse opinions, skill sets and life experiences of their employees. To tap into the full potential of human diversity, organizations need to hire diverse talent and create an inclusive working culture underpinned by a fundamental sense of belonging, fairness and equity, enabling people to bring their “full self” to work. In the Fourth Industrial Revolution, most companies are set to implement new technologies and practices to manage their workforces. However, implementing these tools without due consideration risks a range of unintended consequences which can ultimately undermine a company’s reputation and competitive position. Today, more than ever before, new workplace technologies and practices are no longer simply “neutral” with regard to diversity, equity and inclusion outcomes. Leading companies are increasingly recognizing this and proactively leveraging technology as part of organization-wide strategies for achieving “Diversity, Equity and Inclusion 4.0”. Conversely, companies without such an integrated approach are increasingly facing unintended consequences and risks when implementing new technology tools. Recent events are a reminder of the persistent inequities that continue to pervade our societies and economies. As companies seek to take on more responsibility for addressing social justice ensuring that diversity and equality becomes the norm in the very near future, a key pathway is to adopt an integrated approach to diversity, equity and inclusion in the workplace, and a renewed commitment to tangible change. Ensuring racial justice, gender parity, disability inclusion, LGBTI equality and inclusion of all forms of human diversity needs to be the “new normal” in the workplace set to emerge from the COVID-19 crisis.This toolkit is designed to highlight the opportunities and outline the challenges specific to greater use of technology in the service of diversity, equity and inclusion efforts. It is designed for organizational leaders, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officers (CDIOs), and others actively working to promote diverse, equitable and inclusive workplaces globally. It is intended to complement a range of related publications produced by the World Economic Forum’s Platform for Shaping the Future of the New Economy and Society: “HR4.0: Shaping People Strategies in the Fourth Industrial Revolution”, developed in collaboration with the Forum’s community of Chief Human Resources Officers (CHROs) and a guide to sound decision-making in the context of the coronavirus pandemic, “Workforce Principles for the COVID-19 Pandemic: Stakeholder Capitalism in a Time of Crisis”.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
20
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

Building Back Better: An Action Plan for the Media, Entertainment and Culture Industry

Title Original Language: 
Building Back Better:An Action Plan for the Media, Entertainment and Culture Industry
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Abstract in English: 
While media consumption has accelerated during the pandemic, the main currency used for media monetization – advertising spend – has been pulled back across many channels, due to both economic and social concerns. Recently, many brands have halted their spending on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. While the advertising revenue of such platforms is driven largely by small and medium enterprises, events of late may signal a larger shift in focus to the role that one’s business decisions play in driving societal change. For media companies with significant reach and influence over consumers, this responsibility is even more crucial. We assessed how media organizations responded to COVID-19 and addressed their societal responsibility. In this second paper, we focus on the near-term and medium-term actions that can be taken to improve the financial viability, resilience and sustainability of the industry. We focus on four key areas: Creating a stronger media ecosystem across content creation, distribution and consumption innovation. We identified five key areas to drive a stronger media ecosystem: enhanced trust and transparency, better alignment of value with investments, media pluralism, a global community of creators and viewers, and renewed consumer focus. We examined the demonetization of harmful content through initiatives such as the Global Alliance for Responsible Media, in partnership with the Forum’s “Shaping the Future of Media, Entertainment and Culture” platform. Accelerating digital transformation to drive innovation. Digital distribution is no longer a choice – companies must decide whether to build, buy or partner to increase their digital capabilities.–New digital production methods have created lower-cost and more authentic content – companies should consider how they adopt end-to-end cloud production tools to capture, edit, finalize and distribute content in a single workflow from start to finish. Notable innovation in the use of data-driven tools for revenue projections, content curation and moderation, and user experience will present new decisions for businesses. With a significant increase in cyber threats during the COVID era, businesses need to take practical steps to increase their cyber resilience. Adapting the workforce and ways of working to support the next phase of industry growth. Work has transitioned to home-office settings with varying degrees of effectiveness – businesses should consider what capabilities are needed to operate in a hybrid work model in the future. Worker profiles in demand will be in big data, analytics and revenue-related functions, as well as in security and data privacy, but the industry is unlikely to go back to pre-COVID employment levels. With heavy reliance on freelance and contract work, there is an opportunity to revisit the industry’s duty of care to its workers and reset on its representation of minorities. In addition, employers will need to find new ways to protect employees’ safety and mental health. Supporting responsible business through global sustainable development goals (SDGs) –The urgency to act as responsible media businesses has never been higher, with three-quarters of media chief executive officers recognizing the critical role1 of businesses in society and three out of five consumers claiming to avoid brands that do not demonstrate progress against the goals affecting our society and planet. Businesses should evaluate their impact in terms of environmental and social considerations and reset their activities in line with the SDGs. Responsible leadership is a critical enabler of sustainable governance. Top leaders exhibit five elements of responsible leadership: 1) stakeholder inclusion; 2) emotion and intuition; 3) mission and purpose; 4) technology and innovation; and 5) intellect and insight. At the end of this paper, we identify actions that companies can take immediately, such as reviewing their media investment strategies, employing new brand safety tools, implementing new ways to create an engaged workforce and many others. A number of the companies engaged for this report have already committed to such actions, and we encourage other companies for which these steps are relevant to carry them out within their own businesses. In the final paper of this series, we will highlight the lasting industry shifts that will result from the current crisis and the long-term plans that various parts of the media ecosystem should consider when developing their strategies.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
26
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

Global Employment Trends for Youth 2020: Technology and the future of jobs

Title Original Language: 
Global Employment Trends for Youth 2020: Technology and the future of jobs
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, March 6, 2020
Abstract in English: 
Incorporating the most recent labour market information available, Global Employment Trends for Youth sets out the youth labour market situation around the world. It shows where progress has or has not been made, updates world and regional youth labour market indicators, and gives detailed analyses of medium-term trends in youth population, labour force, employment and unemployment. The 2020 edition discusses the implications of technological change for the nature of jobs available to young people. It focuses on shifts in job characteristics, sectors and skills, as well as examining the impact of technological change on inequalities in youth labour markets.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
186
Country Original Language: 
Share: 
Topics: 

Implementing the ILO Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention No. 169: Towards an inclusive, sustainable and just future

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, February 3, 2020
Abstract in English: 
In 1989, the ILO adopted the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention No. 169. Since then, the Convention has been ratified by 23 countries, and has guided and inspired governments, trade unions and employers’ organizations as well as indigenous peoples across the world in their work to promote and protect indigenous peoples’ rights.
Thirty years have passed since the adoption of Convention No. 169. This report presents the social and economic situation of indigenous women and men today by looking at key aspects such as population, employment and poverty, as well as the important strides made in public policies, particularly with regard to institutions, consultation and participation. It highlights the critical role of the Convention as a framework for social justice, peace, participatory democracy, and inclusive and sustainable development for all – which is necessary to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and undertake meaningful climate action.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
160
Share: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Employment