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Employment

Productivity and Jobs in a Globalised World

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, April 26, 2018
Abstract in English: 
This report looks at how regional policies can support productivity growth and jobs. While there has been a remarkable decline in inequality in OECD countries, inequality among regions within certain countries has increased over the same time period. Regions that narrowed productivity gaps tended to benefit from economically vibrant tradable sectors and integration with well-functioning cities. This report considers in detail the role of the tradable sector as a driver of productivity growth and its relationship with employment. It addresses the possible risks of a growing tradable sector and how diversification is central to strengthening regional economic resilience. It considers how regions integrate global value chains and highlights the role of regional and policy links in fostering productivity growth and job creation. It asks what policies can help better anticipate or cushion shocks from trade in specific regions and, more generally, what strategies and framework conditions are conducive for regional productivity and employment growth.
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188
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The future evolution of civil society in the European Union by 2030

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, March 1, 2018
Abstract in English: 
This publication provides an analysis of the main challenges faced by civil society organisations (CSOs), of the trends and drivers of change and of the future prospects for relations between policy-makers at the national and European level and CSOs. It was developed with the purpose of examining what might await European CSOs in the next 13 years until 2030, what are the main challenges and how these should be tackled. Based on desk research of recent analyses and studies, series of interviews with representatives of academia, European and national CSO platforms and members of EESC and pan-European survey, it identifies major societal trends that have been most affecting European CSOS in the last five years : demographic changes, economic crisis, digitalisation, populism and shrinking of civic space. This overview is accompanied by strategies recommended for CSOs and the EU and national public authorities.
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66
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Global Trendometer - Essays on medium- and long-term global trends

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, September 4, 2017
Abstract in English: 
The European Union has come through difficult years. A succession of crises, often interlinked, have been the major concern of European leaders for much of the past decade. This experience has driven home the lesson that prevention is better than the cure, and that more can be done to identify and prepare for future challenges. The EU as a whole has worked to enhance its foresight capacity, notably through the work of the inter-institutional ESPAS process. For its part, the European Parliament is placing greater emphasis on agenda-setting and on horizon scanning, both to support its work in shaping the future through legislation and to improve the quality of public policy discussion of key challenges and choices ahead.
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62
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The Next Production Revolution - Implications for Governments and Business

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, May 10, 2017
Abstract in English: 
This publication examines the opportunities and challenges, for business and government, associated with technologies bringing about the “next production revolution”. These include a variety of digital technologies (e.g. the Internet of Things and advanced robotics), industrial biotechnology, 3D printing, new materials and nanotechnology. Some of these technologies are already used in production, while others will be available in the near future. All are developing rapidly. As these technologies transform the production and the distribution of goods and services, they will have far-reaching consequences for productivity, skills, income distribution, well-being and the environment. The more that governments and firms understand how production could develop in the near future, the better placed they will be to address the risks and reap the benefits.
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442
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Building a Better Future

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, May 5, 2017
Abstract in English: 
To many Americans, the difficult issues facing Central America’s Northern Triangle—El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras—may seem distant. But the future of the United States is tied to these countries as some of our closest neighbors. Geography alone demonstrates that their stability and prosperity is critical to our national interest.
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52
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The Future of Jobs and Skills in Africa Preparing the Region for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Abstract in English: 
With more than 60% of its population under the age of 25, sub-Saharan Africa is already the world’s youngest region today – and, by 2030, will be home to more than one-quarter of the world’s under-25 population. As this young population, the best-educated and globally connected the continent has ever had, enters the world of work, the region has a demographic opportunity. But the region can only leverage this opportunity by unlocking latent talent and preparing its people for the future of work.
The Executive Briefing – drawing on the insight and project work of the Forum’s System Initiative on Shaping the Future of Education, Gender and Work – aims to serve as a practical guide for leaders from business, government, civil society and the education sector, and finds that the region’s capacity to adapt to the requirements of future jobs leaves little space for complacency. While a number of African economies are relatively under-exposed to labour market disruptions at present, this picture is changing rapidly. This window of opportunity must be used by the region’s leaders to prepare for tomorrow.
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28
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The future of industry in Europe

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, April 19, 2017
Abstract in English: 
This study analyses the key challenges for Local and Regional Authorities (LRAs) in developing a long-term, structured industrial policy, with a global view. The policy should promote structural change and raise the industrial contribution to GDP to the 20% target set by the European Commission (EC) in December 2014.
New means of production incorporate a mix of processes located in both high-cost and low-cost countries and are based on a wide range of factors enabled by technological developments. Significant changes in consumption are increasingly driven by individual needs which are more sensitive to social and environmental aspects. Together these require a more flexible, hybrid and servitisation-oriented industrial paradigm.
The way LRAs can guide this shift strictly depends on their ability to combine strengths in traditional sectors with innovative trajectories of industrial development in dynamic new sectors. Faced with a growing complexity of industrial challenges, LRAs are called on to design and implement a systemic industrial policy coordinated with national and EU level policies, pulled by vision and pushed by competition.
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140
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The sharing economy: challenges and outlook

Title Original Language: 
Enjeux et perspectives de la consommation collaborative
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, April 10, 2017
Abstract in English: 
In the broadest sense, the sharing economy may be defined as a community of individuals lending, renting, donating, sharing, swapping and buying goods or services.

There are currently around 300 digital peer-to-peer platforms in France, many of which have an established global presence. This study looks at the state of the sharing economy – from a qualitative and quantitative slant – and analyses supply and demand trends across the following key sectors: travel, transport and storage services, accommodation, entertainment, food, consumer goods, clothing and footwear, domestic services and finance.

The study also considers how traditional players are responding – in some cases to direct competition from the sharing economy – and dissects the positive and negative forces shaping this new phenomenon, touching on aspects such as macroeconomic factors, regulation, new technologies, consumer habits and business model viability.

In addition, the authors outline a series of scenarios depicting what the sharing economy could look like in 2020 – a transition, a partnership between traditional players and new sharing economy protagonists, and an “economic bubble” triggered by unworkable business models. The study concludes with a set of recommendations on ways to foster this emerging trend through policy-making and regulation, focusing on the need to protect consumers, bolster sharing economy initiatives, and create a level playing field.

The service providers behind this study remain exclusively liable for the research methods used, as well as the findings and recommendations detailed in this report.
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336
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The future of additive manufacturing - 3D printing

Title Original Language: 
Futur de la fabrication additive
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, March 3, 2017
Abstract in English: 
The innovative power of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, lies in the way in which objects are designed and produced. The variety of processes used means that applications can be developed for industry – such as the creation of equipment or intermediate products – as well as for consumers. The technology, which has had several decades to mature, is making leaps and bounds, and has the potential to be deployed on a much wider scale in the future.

An in-depth review examines the various parts of the market, including the different stakeholders involved, the users (manufacturers and the general public) as well as the various ecosystems that create synergy between the various initiatives. It highlights the potential of additive manufacturing, in terms of boosting the competitiveness of French companies and creating opportunities in France's regions.

The review also includes four possible scenarios that show how the market could develop, and lists the roadblocks and drivers that influence each one. They are entitled "prototyping and experimentation", "scale-up of customisation", "mass production and performance improvements" and "shifts in the value chain". The goal of the resulting recommendations is to improve the conditions for providing support for stakeholders so that additive manufacturing can reach its full potential.

The methods used, the results obtained and the recommendations are the sole responsibility of the authors of the study.
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250
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Innovative uses of cars and new ways of getting around

Title Original Language: 
Usages novateurs de la voiture et nouvelles mobilités
Abstract Original Language: 
Ce travail se donne pour objectif d’explorer de nouvelles voies d’interprétation de l’émergence et de la transition des transports contemporains vers les nouveaux services de mobilité automobile. Aujourd’hui, les « nouvelles mobilités » font, en effet, figure de « nouvelle frontière » pour une partie du monde politique et intellectuel. Elles sont parées des vertus supposées d’une « croissance verte » qui redonnerait l’avantage aux pays et territoires mis à mal par la mondialisation et ses effets désindustrialisant. Ces nouvelles mobilités permettraient, selon cette croyance, de tourner le dos à un XXe siècle où l’on aurait confondu le progrès avec la croissance infinie d’une production industrielle aussi polluante qu’aliénante pour les consommateurs comme pour les travailleurs. Dans le programme politique qu’elles sous-entendent, ces nouvelles formes de mobilité engageraient les individus à réfléchir de manière plus collective et entrepreneuriale. Elles permettraient de créer de nouveaux besoins et de nouveaux profits dans la droite ligne des grandes thématiques contemporaines que sont le
numérique et l’écologie. Symbole d’une vision « high-tech » de l’écologie, ces nouvelles formes de mobilités tendent à se constituer comme un nouveau paradigme de l’automobile. Celui-ci serait appelé à structurer de nouveaux écosystèmes d’affaires qui permettraient d’amorcer une transition vers « le futur ». Aujourd’hui, on attribue bien volontiers à l’industrie automobile, à ses usines et à ses acteurs, les caractéristiques d’une économie vieillissante et conservatrice, incapable de se recomposer et d’adhérer à ce « nouveau paradigme ». Dans la vision positiviste dominante, l’industrie automobile est d’emblée condamnée. Elle représente une vision passéiste de l’économie et de la société, avec laquelle il est politiquement de plus en plus difficile de s’imposer.

L’idée que nous défendons dans ce rapport est que l’on peut entrevoir la dynamique des nouvelles mobilités et des nouveaux services automobiles à travers un prisme « industrialiste » et écologique, c'est-à-dire, comme un moyen de répondre aux impératifs sociaux et environnementaux auxquels est confrontée la société française ainsi que son industrie. En effet, nous pensons que, plutôt que d’opposer un « ancien » et un « nouveau monde » des mobilités automobiles, il est aujourd’hui indispensable d’identifier et de développer des « ponts » entre l’industrie automobile et les nouveaux services de mobilité aujourd’hui en pleine expansion.

Ce rapport propose d’évaluer les potentialités d’une telle hypothèse et d’identifier des voies de transition vers une massification des nouveaux usages automobiles.
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
Abstract in English: 
Usage rather than ownership of vehicles is driving the expansion of car sharing and carpooling, among other new uses. Driven by the digital revolution, these new services are expected to radically transform how we get around, and will change the relationship between the various stakeholders – both newcomers and long-standing players – that contribute to its implementation.

This forward-looking analysis uses a variety of scenarios to examine the economic and environmental gains if such services expand and gain traction across the country. Such a shift would mean an optimised fleet of automobiles that are used more intensively and renewed more often. The study's recommendations call for expanded synergies between stakeholders, with possible public-sector support.

The methodology used, the results obtained and the recommendations are the sole responsibility of the authors of the study, and do not represent the views of the Pipame, the DGE or the other sponsors.
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269
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