RSS:

Newsletter subscribe:

Resources

Urban Governance in the EU - Current Challenges and Future Prospects

Title Original Language: 
Urban Governance in the EU - Current Challenges and Future Prospects
Abstract Original Language: 
The quality of territorial foresight and, in particular, of urban foresight, is nowadays measured not so much in terms of the ability to anticipate possible futures, always challenged by the increasing uncertainty and the exponential rate of change, as in terms of the ability to construct collective visions of the future that are ambitious, proactive and engaging for stakeholders and citizens.
What foresight has to offer is its capacity to approach both long-term challenges, perceived in the present, as well as shared aims and values in a distant horizon. This publication attempts to address these challenges by ‘imagineering’ the future of cities though the application of methods and techniques drawn
from the strategic foresight and prediction fields in a systematic, rigorous and holistic way.
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2011
Abstract in English: 
The quality of territorial foresight and, in particular, of urban foresight, is nowadays measured not so much in terms of the ability to anticipate possible futures, always challenged by the increasing uncertainty and the exponential rate of change, as in terms of the ability to construct collective visions of the future that are ambitious, proactive and engaging for stakeholders and citizens.
What foresight has to offer is its capacity to approach both long-term challenges, perceived in the present, as well as shared aims and values in a distant horizon. This publication attempts to address these challenges by ‘imagineering’ the future of cities though the application of methods and techniques drawn from the strategic foresight and prediction fields in a systematic, rigorous and holistic way.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
199
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

Governance of Metropolitan Regions. European and Global Experiences

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, June 20, 2011
Abstract in English: 
For many years now the Committee of the Regions has been building a reputation of being "the EU's Assembly of Regional and Local Representatives".
It decided to contribute to the debate on metropolitan governance by pulling resources together with a long-standing international partner like the Forum of Federations (FoF). The going together with such a renowned global academic network on federalism in this project, provided the CoR with an unprecedented mix of analytical and policy expertise on urban and metropolitan issues to be able to offer to our members and the rest of the EU institutions.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
183
Share: 

Is Global Collapse Imminent ?

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, August 4, 2014
Abstract in English: 
The Limits to Growth “standard run” (or business-as-usual, BAU) scenario produced about forty years ago aligns well with historical data that has been updated in this paper. The BAU scenario results in collapse of the global economy and environment (where standards of living fall at rates faster than they have historically risen due to disruption of normal economic functions), subsequently forcing population down. Although the modelled fall in population occurs after about 2030 - with death rates rising from 2020 onward, reversing contemporary trends - the general onset of collapse first appears at about 2015 when per capita industrial output begins a sharp decline. Given this imminent timing, a further issue this paper raises is whether the current economic difficulties of the global financial crisis are potentially related to mechanisms of breakdown in the Limits to Growth BAU scenario. In particular, contemporary peak oil issues and analysis of net energy, or energy return on (energy) invested, support the Limits to Growth modelling of resource constraints underlying the collapse.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
22
Share: 

World energy, technology and climate policy outlook - WETO 2030

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, January 1, 2003
Abstract in English: 
The world energy, technology and climate policy outlook (WETO) positions Europe in a global context. It provides a coherent framework to analyse the energy, technology and environment trends and issues over the period from now to 2030. In this way, it supports long-term European policy-making particularly considering the questions related to (1) the security of energy supply; (2) the European research area; (3) Kyoto targets and beyond. Using the POLES energy model and starting from a set of clear key assumptions on economic activity, population and hydrocarbon resources, WETO describes in detail the evolution of world and European energy systems, taking into account the impacts of climate change policies. The reference scenario encompasses international energy prices, primary fuel supply (oil, gas and coal), energy demand (global, regional and sectoral), power generation technologies and carbon dioxide emissions trends. To face uncertainties, WETO presents alternative scenarios corresponding to different assumptions on availability of oil and gas resources (low/high cases) and on technological progress (gas, coal, nuclear and renewable cases). Two major policy issues are addressed: (1) the outlook of the European Union gas market in a world perspective (impressive growth in gas demand and increasing dependence on energy imports); (2) the impacts of greenhouse gas emission reduction policies on the world energy system and on progress in power generation technologies. The rigorous analysis of long-term scenarios, with particular attention to the European Union in a global context, will enable policy-makers to define better energy, technology and environmental policies for a sustainable future.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Share: 

Towards a Post-Carbon Society

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, January 1, 2008
Abstract in English: 
Two major challenges will have to be addressed on the way towards a “postcarbon society”: the adoption of new forms of energy (cf. security of supply, availability of resources, oil price) and the adaptation to the climate change that is already taking place.
Most of the time, these issues are tackled from the supply side and the technological perspective. But the demand side is crucial. The political initiatives, the economic incentives and the social behaviour can make a difference. This publication covers issues including in the long term such as globalisation, behavioural changes, market mechanisms, “rethinking the city”, social acceptability, job creation, land-use and public services. It also addresses the role of politics and social actors (businesses and trade unions) as well as the new governance for a post-carbon society.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Share: 

Energy Futures - The role of research and technological development

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, January 1, 2006
Abstract in English: 
This publication aims to give an overview of the methods and results concerning the future challenges in energy. Using various tools for energy foresight – quantitative models, Delphi survey and back-casting approach – Energy futures analyses Europe in a world context. It also highlights the importance of research in the energy field. Finally, it presents EU projects in this field at the cross roads of technology and socio-economy.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Share: 

Energy corridors

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, January 1, 2007
Abstract in English: 
The European Union is concerned by the competitiveness, security and sustainability of its energy system. This publication presents the main results of the ENCOURAGED project that assessed the potential energy corridors between the EU and its neighbouring countries addressing in particular the issues on natural gas, electricity and hydrogen. The EU neighbouring countries are the main suppliers and transit countries of oil and natural gas. The dependency of the EU on imported gas supplies is largely increasing in the next years. Therefore, the role of neighbouring countries will grow significantly in the next decades and will probably extend to electricity exchanges and perhaps, in the next decades, to hydrogen supply. Three main points are of particular importance for the integration of the energy markets of the EU and neighbouring countries: to get compatible interconnections, compatible market framework and compatible environmental policies.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Share: 

Resources Futures

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Saturday, December 1, 2012
Abstract in English: 
This report is an output of the Resources Futures project, which explores the range of critical constraints and uncertainties faced globally, and the implications for future policies and political agendas. The report builds on the findings of a study prepared for the National Intelligence Council (NIC) in early 2012 assessing the impacts of natural resources on US national security by 2020, 2030 and 2040.
The spectre of resource insecurity has come back with a vengeance. The world is undergoing a period of intensified resource stress, driven in part by the scale and speed of demand growth from emerging economies and a decade of tight commodity markets. Poorly designed and short-sighted policies are also making things worse, not better. Whether or not resources are actually running out, the outlook is one of supply disruptions, volatile prices, accelerated environmental degradation and rising political tensions over resource access. Fears of resource scarcity are not new. On many occasions, higher rates of investment and improved technology have resolved the problem of the day, though often with additional environmental and social costs. With the maturation of technologies to access non-conventional gas and oil, as well as the global economic downturn, some analysts suggest that the resource boom of the past decade is coming to an end – especially in the extractive industries – and that resource related tensions will ease. The hard truth is that many of the fundamental conditions that gave rise to the tight markets in the past ten years remain. In the case of food, the world remains only one or two bad harvests away from another global crisis. Lower prices in the meantime may simply trigger another bout of resource binge, especially in the large and growing developing countries. This report focuses on the new political economy of resources. It analyses the latest global trends in the production, trade and consumption of key raw materials or intermediate products and explores how defensive and offensive moves by governments and other stakeholders are creating new fault lines on top of existing weaknesses and uncertainties. The report also proposes a series of critical interventions, including new informal dialogues involving a group of systemically significant producer and consumer countries (‘Resource 30’ or R30) to tackle resource price volatility and to improve confidence and coordination in increasingly integrated global resource markets.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Share: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Resources