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2030

Global Trends to 2030: The Future of Work and Workplaces

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, October 18, 2018
Abstract in English: 
In some ways, the future of work is here; in others, it is shrouded in uncertainty or heralded with great expectations. Of course, throughout human history, work has changed, as have societies. Transformations in how and where work is conducted, by whom it is performed and under what conditions, as well as how it is remunerated and valued, have come hand in hand with changes in individual and family life, social cohesion and wellbeing, and civic and political life. Today, a number of observed mega-trends are again shifting the tectonics of work: Pervasive digital technology is opening up boundless new opportunities while at the same time blurring workplace boundaries and impacting human behaviours and expectations in ways that may still be unknown. Continuing population growth will create the biggest – but potentially most precarious and polarised – global workforce to date, with sustainability implications of an existential scale.
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14
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The future evolution of civil society in the European Union by 2030

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, March 1, 2018
Abstract in English: 
This publication provides an analysis of the main challenges faced by civil society organisations (CSOs), of the trends and drivers of change and of the future prospects for relations between policy-makers at the national and European level and CSOs. It was developed with the purpose of examining what might await European CSOs in the next 13 years until 2030, what are the main challenges and how these should be tackled. Based on desk research of recent analyses and studies, series of interviews with representatives of academia, European and national CSO platforms and members of EESC and pan-European survey, it identifies major societal trends that have been most affecting European CSOS in the last five years : demographic changes, economic crisis, digitalisation, populism and shrinking of civic space. This overview is accompanied by strategies recommended for CSOs and the EU and national public authorities.
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66
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Innovative uses of cars and new ways of getting around

Title Original Language: 
Usages novateurs de la voiture et nouvelles mobilités
Abstract Original Language: 
Ce travail se donne pour objectif d’explorer de nouvelles voies d’interprétation de l’émergence et de la transition des transports contemporains vers les nouveaux services de mobilité automobile. Aujourd’hui, les « nouvelles mobilités » font, en effet, figure de « nouvelle frontière » pour une partie du monde politique et intellectuel. Elles sont parées des vertus supposées d’une « croissance verte » qui redonnerait l’avantage aux pays et territoires mis à mal par la mondialisation et ses effets désindustrialisant. Ces nouvelles mobilités permettraient, selon cette croyance, de tourner le dos à un XXe siècle où l’on aurait confondu le progrès avec la croissance infinie d’une production industrielle aussi polluante qu’aliénante pour les consommateurs comme pour les travailleurs. Dans le programme politique qu’elles sous-entendent, ces nouvelles formes de mobilité engageraient les individus à réfléchir de manière plus collective et entrepreneuriale. Elles permettraient de créer de nouveaux besoins et de nouveaux profits dans la droite ligne des grandes thématiques contemporaines que sont le
numérique et l’écologie. Symbole d’une vision « high-tech » de l’écologie, ces nouvelles formes de mobilités tendent à se constituer comme un nouveau paradigme de l’automobile. Celui-ci serait appelé à structurer de nouveaux écosystèmes d’affaires qui permettraient d’amorcer une transition vers « le futur ». Aujourd’hui, on attribue bien volontiers à l’industrie automobile, à ses usines et à ses acteurs, les caractéristiques d’une économie vieillissante et conservatrice, incapable de se recomposer et d’adhérer à ce « nouveau paradigme ». Dans la vision positiviste dominante, l’industrie automobile est d’emblée condamnée. Elle représente une vision passéiste de l’économie et de la société, avec laquelle il est politiquement de plus en plus difficile de s’imposer.

L’idée que nous défendons dans ce rapport est que l’on peut entrevoir la dynamique des nouvelles mobilités et des nouveaux services automobiles à travers un prisme « industrialiste » et écologique, c'est-à-dire, comme un moyen de répondre aux impératifs sociaux et environnementaux auxquels est confrontée la société française ainsi que son industrie. En effet, nous pensons que, plutôt que d’opposer un « ancien » et un « nouveau monde » des mobilités automobiles, il est aujourd’hui indispensable d’identifier et de développer des « ponts » entre l’industrie automobile et les nouveaux services de mobilité aujourd’hui en pleine expansion.

Ce rapport propose d’évaluer les potentialités d’une telle hypothèse et d’identifier des voies de transition vers une massification des nouveaux usages automobiles.
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, February 1, 2017
Abstract in English: 
Usage rather than ownership of vehicles is driving the expansion of car sharing and carpooling, among other new uses. Driven by the digital revolution, these new services are expected to radically transform how we get around, and will change the relationship between the various stakeholders – both newcomers and long-standing players – that contribute to its implementation.

This forward-looking analysis uses a variety of scenarios to examine the economic and environmental gains if such services expand and gain traction across the country. Such a shift would mean an optimised fleet of automobiles that are used more intensively and renewed more often. The study's recommendations call for expanded synergies between stakeholders, with possible public-sector support.

The methodology used, the results obtained and the recommendations are the sole responsibility of the authors of the study, and do not represent the views of the Pipame, the DGE or the other sponsors.
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269
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Latin America and the Caribbean 2030: Future Scenarios

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016
Abstract in English: 
The report finds that if the region and world move ahead as expected, 57 million more Latin Americans and Caribbean citizens will join the middle class over the fourteen-year period. Annual regional GDP growth will be 2.4 percent, slightly outperforming the US rate of 2.2 percent. But the region will face significant challenges ranging from income inequality to its demography and the impact of climate change.
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156
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Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, April 24, 2016
Abstract in English: 
To build the best future for our country, we have based our Vision for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on three pillars that represent our unique competitive advantages. Our status will enable us to build on our leading role as the heart of Arab and Islamic worlds. At the same time, we will use our investment power to create a more diverse and sustainable economy. Finally, we will use our strategic location to build our role as an integral driver of international trade and to connect three continents: Africa, Asia and Europe.
Our Vision is built around three themes: a vibrant society, a thriving economy and an ambitious nation.
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86
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Advancing into the Golden Years – Cost of healthcare for Asia Pacific's elderly

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, August 24, 2016
Abstract in English: 
Asia Pacific (APAC)* is the fastest ageing region in the world with more than 200 million people expected to move into the ranks of the elderly (aged 65 years and above) between now and 2030. This represents an increase of 71 percent in the number of elderly people, compared to increases of 55 percent in North America and 31 percent in Europe over the same period.
Driven by improving socio-economic conditions and increasing life-expectancy, the speed at which societies in APAC are ageing poses an unprecedented challenge. For comparison, Singapore’s elderly population will rise from 11 to 20 percent in the next 15 years, while it took France 49 years to do the same. By 2030, Japan will become the world’s first “ultra-aged” nation, with the elderly accounting for more than 28 percent of the population, while Hong Kong, South Korea, and Taiwan will be considered “super-aged”, with more than 21 percent.
Many APAC countries are moving from a period when they reaped a “demographic dividend” to one where they face the prospect of paying a “demographic tax”. Such a significant demographic shift will be accompanied by a host of financial and socio-economic risks affecting multiple stakeholders, as shown in Exhibit A. Consequently, there is an urgent need to evaluate each country’s readiness to manage increasingly aged societies and to develop solutions that mitigate the associated risks. This report takes a deeper look into the impact of societal ageing on elderly healthcare costs in APAC.
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68
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Reviewing the Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development - “Early Movers” Can Help Maintain Momentum

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2016
Abstract in English: 
At the Sustainable Development Summit in September 2015 the heads of state and government of all the UN member states adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Several countries, including Germany, committed to move rapidly on implementation. During the UN High-level Political Forum (HLPF) in July 2016, twentytwo countries volunteered to conduct national reviews of their implementation. Moreover, UN member states plan to adopt a resolution on the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda before that meeting. What initiatives would be most helpful for maintaining the momentum and making ambitious progress on implementing and reviewing the Agenda?
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4
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Germany 2030: Germany's Prosperity Rests on Innovation

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Abstract in English: 
In the coming years, prosperity in Germany will have to be generated through technology and knowledge to an increasing degree. Technological progress will become the sole driver of growth in the long run as growth contributed by labour and capital declines in the face of demographic change.
Germany must now chart the course for this transformation.

Radical technological change will slash marginal costs, opening up completely new business models. This will change value added in key sectors including mobility, healthcare and energy, and increase integration with services.

Germany must take more concerted action than it has so far to set the course for industrial policy going forward. Although Germany still boasts a range of outstanding benefits as a business location, it must tackle weak points in the start-up environment, venture capital, public investment and regulatory parameters for key technologies.

The strategic priorities of German industrial policy must continue to be the deepening of the European single market and the international trade and investment regime. Bilateral and multilateral trade policy has moved into rougher waters while the untapped potential right here in the European Union
is wholly underestimated.

In the digital world too, a good balance must be found between productivity and social cohesion. While this vision is still forming on the horizon, the political course taken now will determine whether it will turn into a positive or a plaintive reality.
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40
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Urban world: The global consumers to watch

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, March 20, 2016
Abstract in English: 
Dramatic demographic shifts are transforming the world’s consumer landscape. Our new research finds just three groups of consumers are set to generate half of global urban consumption growth from 2015 to 2030.
Until the turn of this century, population growth generated more than half of all global consumption. But between 2015 and 2030, three-quarters of global consumption growth will be driven by individuals spending more. This shift has profound implications for companies. What’s now important are emerging demographics: the latest report from the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) finds that nine groups will generate three-quarters of global urban consumption growth to 2030, and just three of these will generate half of consumption growth and have the power to reshape global consumer markets over the next 15 years.
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140
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Strategic Foresight: How to Enhance the Implementation of 2030 Sustainable Development Goals in Developing Countries

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, January 18, 2016
Abstract in English: 
This publication is the third in a series of newsletters dedicated to raising awareness of global trends analysis and how future scenarios may affect Latin America. It summarizes a report by the UN Economic and Social Council on the importance of strengthening strategic predictive capabilities for policy makers, particularly in developing countries.

The report, Strategic foresight for the post-2015 development agenda, delineates the priorities of the UN Commission on Science and Technology for Development.

The summary accompanies a presentation by Dialogue senior fellow Sergio Bitar to the commission in May 2015 in Geneva, designed to complement the main ideas and proposals in their report. We are also pleased to include an essay by Amy Zalman, CEO and president of the World Future Society, on governance as it relates to anticipating global trends.
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10
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