RSS:

Newsletter subscribe:

Digital Innovation

Rethinking Cybersecurity

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, January 9, 2018
Abstract in English: 
Despite all the attention, cyberspace is far from secure. Why this is so reflects conceptual weaknesses as much as imperfect technologies. Two questions highlight shortcomings in the discussion of cybersecurity. The first is why, after more than two decades, we have not seen anything like a cyber Pearl Harbor, cyber 9/11, or cyber catastrophe, despite constant warnings. The second is why, despite the increasing quantity of recommendations, there has been so little improvement, even when these recommendations are implemented.
These questions share an answer: the concepts underlying cybersecurity are an aggregation of ideas conceived in a different time, based on millennial expectations about governance and international security. Similarly, the internet of the 1990s has become “cyber,” a portmanteau term that encompassed the broad range of global economic, political, and military activities transformed by the revolution created by digital technologies.
If our perceptions of the nature of cybersecurity are skewed, so are our defenses. This report examines the accuracy of our perceptions of cybersecurity. It attempts to embed the problem of cyber attack (not crime or espionage) in the context of larger strategic calculations and effects. It argues that policies and perceptions of cybersecurity are determined by factors external to cyberspace, such as political trends affecting relations among states, by thinking on the role of government, and by public attitudes toward risk.
We can begin to approach the problem of cybersecurity by defining attack. While public usage calls every malicious action in cyberspace an attack, it is more accurate to define attacks as those actions using cyber techniques or tools for violence or coercion to achieve political effect. This places espionage and crime in a separate discussion (while noting that some states use crime for political ends and rampant espionage creates a deep sense of concern among states).
Cyber attack does not threaten crippling surprise or existential risk. This means that the incentives for improvement that might motivate governments and companies are, in fact, much smaller than we assume. Nor is cyber attack random and unpredictable. It reflects national policies for coercion and crime. Grounding policy in a more objective appreciation of risk and intent is a first step toward better security.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
50
Share: 

Digitally-enabled automation and artificial intelligence: Shaping the future of work in Europe’s digital front-runners

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, October 25, 2017
Abstract in English: 
Technology in many ways is perfectly conceived to operate in the workplace, bringing an ability to operate around the clock at increasing levels of accuracy and productivity. Since the Industrial Revolution, machines have been the ideal colleague, performing some of the most mind-numbing tasks and freeing up human partners to do more interesting and productive things. However, in the near future, new digital technologies are set to take the next step, graduating from the factory floor to the boardroom and applying themselves to more complex, cognitive activities.
Technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) are a game changer for automation in the workplace. Like ambitious young go-getters, they promise to take on more responsibility and make better decisions, and the implications for workers, companies, and policy makers are significant and pressing.
The impact of new digital technologies on the labor market has led to the coining of the phrase “technological unemployment,” which describes a view of how the industrialization of the workplace may play out. However, that perspective ignores the other side of the technological coin, which is that automation also creates jobs and brings a positive economic impact from its ability to boost innovation and productivity, and offers advances in fields including healthcare, retail and security.
This report is an attempt to provide a long-term view of how that balance may develop, based on scenarios of how digital automation and AI will shape the workplace, and calibrated to sensitivities around the economy, productivity, job creation and skills.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
72
Share: 

OECD Digital Economy Outlook 2017

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, October 11, 2017
Abstract in English: 
The biennial OECD Digital Economy Outlook examines and documents evolutions and emerging opportunities and challenges in the digital economy. It highlights how OECD countries and partner economies are taking advantage of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the Internet to meet their public policy objectives. Through comparative evidence, it informs policy makers of regulatory practices and policy options to help maximise the potential of the digital economy as a driver for innovation and inclusive growth.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
325
Share: 

Innovation-Led Economic Growth: Transforming Tomorrow’s Developing Economies through Technology and Innovation

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, September 5, 2017
Abstract in English: 
The world faces a confluence of changes and technological advances that are fundamentally altering the relationship between individuals, economies, and society. Innovations in a diverse set of fields including robotics, genetics, artificial intelligence, Internet-enabled sensors, and cloud computing are individually disruptive. Collectively they are world changing. Experts around the world have come up with different names and descriptions for this phenomenon: Klaus Schwab calls it the “fourth industrial revolution”; Alec Ross points toward the “industries of the future”; Steve Case recognizes it as the “third wave” of the Internet; and Martin Ford looks toward the “rise of the robots.”

Although these thinkers have slightly different visions for the future, there is a shared recognition that existing assumptions and economic models need adjustment. For both developed and developing countries, the innovation- and technology-driven economy offers significant risks and opportunities. On the one hand, this change offers the potential for increased global prosperity, efficiency, and quality of life. On the other hand, if poorly managed, this transition could disrupt employment models, pathways out of poverty, and stability around the world.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
60
Share: 

Technology and innovation futures 2017

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, January 23, 2017
Abstract in English: 
The invention and adoption of technologies continues to transform our world. This is most readily apparent in our latest modes of communication and consumption. Facebook alone connects over one and a half billion people each month. We tweet 500 million messages every day – in addition to the billions of texts. We order what we want online – increasingly via smart phones – and often receive those goods and services the same day, sometimes within the hour. Indeed, certain digital products and applications arrive almost instantaneously, and can be stored on remote servers for use on demand
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
24
Share: 

E-santé : faire émerger l’offre française en répondant aux besoins présents et futurs des acteurs de santé

Title Original Language: 
E-santé : faire émerger l’offre française en répondant aux besoins présents et futurs des acteurs de santé
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
Abstract in English: 
Soigner autrement est un impératif de santé publique dans un contexte de vieillissement de la population, d’augmentation des maladies chroniques, d’hyperspécialisation de la médecine, de désertification médicale et d’exigence accrue des patients. C’est également un impératif économique, compte tenu de la difficulté à financer des dépenses de santé qui croissent aujourd’hui plus fortement que le PIB. La France fait partie des pays occidentaux clairement touchés par ces problématiques. Ce sont autant de défis qui appellent à trouver de nouvelles solutions. Le terme d’e-santé a une acception très large puisqu’il désigne tous les aspects numériques touchant de près ou de loin la santé. Cela inclut notamment différents types de contenus numériques liés à la santé, appelés également santé numérique ou télésanté. De manière plus générale, l’e-santé englobe aujourd’hui les innovations d’usages des technologies de l’information et de la communication à l’ensemble des activités en rapport avec la santé. L‘e-santé contribue à apporter des réponses qui permettront de préserver les fondamentaux du système de santé tout en augmentant sa valeur ajoutée pour les professionnels comme pour les patients. Dans le parcours actuel, le barycentre se situe sur le soin. En cible, le poids de chacune des activités devrait évoluer avec le développement de la prévention, de l’accompagnement et de l’information de manière transverse. Le système de santé français s’est bâti autour du soin, c’est-à-dire du traitement des épisodes aigus de la maladie et a délaissé la prévention et l’accompagnement. Le développement des maladies chroniques nécessitant un suivi au long cours, en dehors des phases aigües, ainsi que le vieillissement de la population viennent bousculer ce paradigme. L’enjeu est désormais de: a) soigner de manière plus efficiente en sollicitant moins les ressources du système de santé en particulier l’hôpital. L’ancrage fort sur le "soin" diminue au profit de la prévention et de l’accompagnement. L’e-santé est un levier pour accompagner ce changement de paradigme. Les objets connectés et les applications peuvent aider les citoyens/patients à mieux se prendre en charge, à la fois pour la prévention et le bien-être. L’e-santé est également un atout pour faciliter l’appui aux patients en dehors des phases aigües de soins. Elle permettra grâce à un meilleur suivi du patient de détecter les éventuels risques et de proposer une prise en charge personnalisée. Le traitement massif des données dans une approche Big Data doit favoriser le développement de la médecine personnalisée dont on attend beaucoup tant en termes de traitements plus adaptés qu’en termes de réduction de la consommation des ressources grâce au ciblage des traitements. Le recours au système de santé sera plus personnalisé donc moins susceptible de surconsommation inutile; b) prendre en charge des parcours de soins de manière globale qu’il s’agisse de prévention, de soin, d’accompagnement ou encore d’information. Aujourd’hui, les activités du parcours santé constituent chacune un silo. L’objectif est désormais de s’assurer d’une continuité dans la prise en charge qu’elle soit sanitaire, médicale… Dans ce contexte, les frontières entre la prévention, le soin, l’accompagnement s’estompent et une certaine porosité s’observe. Les évolutions technologiques (objets connectés…) se diffusent rapidement, d’autant que la frontière est ténue entre le monde de l’information et de la santé, de la prévention et de la santé. L’e-santé est ainsi porteuse d’un potentiel d’améliorations pour le système de santé, pour ses professionnels comme pour les patients et la population en général, mais son déploiement peine, en particulier en France, à trouver sa voie et reste cantonné à des expérimentations qui se succèdent. Or, l‘e-santé ne modifiera réellement les pratiques qu’en changeant de dimension. Il faut passer d’un déploiement sur de petits volumes focalisés sur une population étroite, tant de patients que de professionnels de santé, à une utilisation massive et systématique afin de tirer les bénéfices en efficience et en qualité de prise en charge. Comme pour tous les secteurs d’activités, l’usage du numérique ne délivre, en effet vraiment toute sa valeur ajoutée que si son usage est généralisé sur l’ensemble de la chaîne. Ainsi, internet n’a bouleversé nos pratiques d’échanges entre les individus et l’accès à l’information que le jour où la population a été largement utilisatrice. De même, la dématérialisation des processus internes dans les entreprises n’a vraiment augmenté la productivité que le jour où chaque fonction a pu être intégrée dans un système d’information global de l’entreprise. L’engouement pour les ERP1 est venu bien évidemment, du constat que seule l’interconnexion des différentes fonctions dans le même SI apporte un gain radical en matière de qualité et d’efficience. L’étape supplémentaire a été franchie quand la chaîne de valeur intra-entreprise a pu être connectée, à un coût acceptable, via les réseaux internet, avec les fonctions externes à l’entreprise dématérialisant ainsi l’ensemble de cette chaîne et ce sans contraintes géographiques. La richesse de l’information numérique détenue a ainsi crû significativement apportant une valeur ajoutée très significative à l’entreprise (traitement des données, qualification de l’information…). Ce qui est vrai, ici, pour l’entreprise le sera pour la santé.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
120
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

The Digital Future of Brain Health

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, December 5, 2016
Abstract in English: 
What is the benefit of digital technology in healthcare for the brain? What is the likelihood the benefit will reach the people who need it most? In this report, the outgoing World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Brain Research review five emerging themes in digital technology that may impact brain health.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
10
Share: 

5G Vision - The 5G Infrastructure Public Private Partnership: the next generation of communication networks and services

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, July 1, 2016
Abstract in English: 
Future European society and economy will strongly rely on 5G infrastructure. The impact will go far beyond existing wireless access networks with the aim for communication services, reachable everywhere, all the time, and faster. 5G is an opportunity for the European ICT sector which is already well positioned in the global R&D race. 5G technologies will be adopted and deployed globally in alignment with developed and emerging markets’ needs.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
16
Share: 

The Global Information Technology Report 2016

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, July 6, 2016
Abstract in English: 
Finland, Switzerland, Sweden, Israel, Singapore, the Netherlands and the United States are leading the world when it comes to generating economic impact from investments in information and communications technologies (ICT), according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Information Technology Report 2016.

On average, this group of high-achieving economies at the pinnacle of the report’s Networked Readiness Index (NRI) economic impact pillar scores 33% higher than other advanced economies and 100% more than emerging and developing economies. The seven are all known for being early and enthusiastic adopters of ICT and their emergence is significant as it demonstrates that adoption of ICTs – coupled with a supportive enabling environment characterized by sound regulation, quality infrastructure and ready skills supply among other factors – can pave the way to wider benefits.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
306
Share: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Digital Innovation