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The future of additive manufacturing - 3D printing

Title Original Language: 
Futur de la fabrication additive
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, March 3, 2017
Abstract in English: 
The innovative power of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, lies in the way in which objects are designed and produced. The variety of processes used means that applications can be developed for industry – such as the creation of equipment or intermediate products – as well as for consumers. The technology, which has had several decades to mature, is making leaps and bounds, and has the potential to be deployed on a much wider scale in the future.

An in-depth review examines the various parts of the market, including the different stakeholders involved, the users (manufacturers and the general public) as well as the various ecosystems that create synergy between the various initiatives. It highlights the potential of additive manufacturing, in terms of boosting the competitiveness of French companies and creating opportunities in France's regions.

The review also includes four possible scenarios that show how the market could develop, and lists the roadblocks and drivers that influence each one. They are entitled "prototyping and experimentation", "scale-up of customisation", "mass production and performance improvements" and "shifts in the value chain". The goal of the resulting recommendations is to improve the conditions for providing support for stakeholders so that additive manufacturing can reach its full potential.

The methods used, the results obtained and the recommendations are the sole responsibility of the authors of the study.
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250
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The Future of US Global Leadership Implications for Europe, Canada and Transatlantic Cooperation

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Abstract in English: 
Today’s global challenges are developing faster than ever as the world grows more interdependent. Advanced technologies are empowering individuals and organizations in new and unpredictable ways, creating new partnerships but also enabling the rise of new adversaries. A wide array of actors – from non-state groups to rogue states to revisionist powers – are testing these new tools. In parallel, the international system built in the second half of the 20th century is being challenged by emerging regional and global powers, while environmental and other transnational issues have become a determining factor in geopolitics. The resulting complexity and growing number of challenges have made the global security environment more difficult to navigate. It is in this context that the transatlantic relationship is evolving.
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20
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Europe: What to watch out for in 2016-2017

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, January 15, 2016
Abstract in English: 
The European Union seems to be moving from one emergency to the next. Europe’s leaders are in crisis-fighting mode: reactive, improvising, often uncoordinated – but ultimately modestly successful.
The Eurozone has not splintered; Russia is smarting under Western sanctions; some burden-sharing on refugees has been agreed. Busy with short-term problems, however, Europeans have taken their eyes off more profound, long-term challenges. How the European Union copes with its immediate problems in the next couple of years will determine how the continent will fare in decades to come.
In this White Paper, we – the Global Agenda Council on Europe – are analysing some of the most pressing issues confronting the EU in 2016-2017. We present the choices that European leaders must make in the years ahead and explain how these could shape the Union’s medium to long-term development. To illustrate how different policy choices interact, we have drawn up two fictitious scenarios of how the EU could evolve in the next 10 years.
The immediate economic concerns that dominated the European agenda in 2008-2014 are lessening. The cyclical upswing in the European economy, however, must not make governments complacent about the need for reforms. Faced with stagnating or shrinking working-age populations, European countries simply must fix their productivity problem to generate long-term growth. In innovation and digitization, Europeans often seem obsessed with data privacy and protection rather than grasping new opportunities. The European Commission’s laudable attempts to integrate and improve EU markets – for example, for energy and capital – have so far been slow to get off the ground. The arrival of millions of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees is a great opportunity for an ageing Europe, but only if governments, together with the private sector, act swiftly to help the new arrivals find jobs.
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17
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2016 Global Forecast

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, November 15, 2015
Abstract in English: 
An annual collection of wide-ranging essays by CSIS experts, 2016 Global Forecast discusses the issues that will matter most to America and the world’s security and prosperity in the year ahead.
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Number of pages: 
148
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A window of opportunity for Europe

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, June 1, 2015
Abstract in English: 
Europe’s economic growth since the start of the financial crisis has been sluggish, and the region faces difficult long-term demographic and debt-level challenges. But a new McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) report, A Window of Opportunity for Europe, finds that the convergence of low oil prices, a favorable exchange rate, and quantitative easing has given these economies a chance to unlock new economic dynamism by undertaking ambitious reforms and stimulating job creation and investment.
The report identifies 11 growth drivers in three areas—investing for the future, boosting productivity, and mobilizing the workforce—that can help Europe achieve its aspirations. We find that by scaling and speeding reform, mostly at the national level, and stimulating investment and job creation throughout the region, Europe could close its output gap, return to sustained growth of 2 to 3 percent a year over the next ten years, unleash investments of €250 billion to €550 billion annually, and create more than 20 million new jobs (exhibit).
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64
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The economic potential of the ten-point Juncker Plan for growth without debt

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, December 9, 2014
Abstract in English: 
These guidelines correspond to a significant degree to policy priorities established by the Members of the European Parliament during the seventh parliamentary term through a large number of reports and resolutions which received broad support in the plenary. President Juncker's ten points are also broadly in line with several of the objectives set out in the 'Strategic Agenda for the Union in Times of Change', adopted in the European Council in June 2014 when it proposed Mr Juncker to the Parliament as its candidate for President of the Commission.
The potential economic benefits of new European-level action may be measured in terms of additional gross domestic product (GDP) generated or in savings in (current or potential) public expenditure or other expenditure, through a more efficient allocation of resources in the economy as a whole.
The analysis set out in this document suggests that there could be very significant economic gains of these kinds, amounting in time to a maximum achievable potential gain of approximately €1.7 trillion per year, on the basis that Mr Juncker's ten priorities were to be fully implemented in a form consistent with various policy requests made to date by the Parliament.
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84
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Report on the future of the European Union

Title Original Language: 
Rapport sur l’Union européenne
Abstract Original Language: 
Ce nouveau rapport du Club Praxis propose un choc de simplification de l’Union européenne. Il s’attache à faire des propositions concrètes en vue de changer sa gouvernance et de renforcer son fonctionnement démocratique. Nous considérons que la concordance de plusieurs évènements - une crise quasi fatale de la zone euro, la négociation importante sur la zone de libre-échange transatlantique, voire l’anniversaire émouvant des ravages de la Première Guerre mondiale – crée une dynamique de changement, et que l’on ne doit pas confondre la frustration bien compréhensive devant l’attelage baroque et inefficace des 28 pays de l’Union avec un manque d’enthousiasme pour l’idée même d’Europe.
Author: 
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, May 14, 2014
Abstract in English: 
The Club Praxis, French transatlantic think tank, proposes in his latest report on the European Union, a real shock to simplify the EU.
Convinced that enthusiasm for the idea of Europe remains despite the increasing frustration of the French against the inefficiency of Brussels, Praxis Club made 17 proposals to give a fresh start to the EU and rebuild the European project.
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26
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Study of FLAs in the area of Secure, Clean and Efficient Energy

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, November 1, 2012
Abstract in English: 
This report has been prepared in response to the invitation for a study on Secure, Clean and Efficient Energy, in support of the work of the European Forum for Forward-Looking Activities. The aim of this Study is to develop mechanisms for ensuring that Horizon 2020 takes account of a wide range and fuller set of challenges for the area under review. The scope of the study was broadly defined by the societal challenge in this area as set out in the proposal for Horizon 2020, summarised by the objective:
“The specific objective is to make the transition to a reliable, sustainable and competitive energy system, in the face of increasingly scarce resources, increasing energy needs and climate change.” (DS 1293/12, p.93)
The key questions addressed in this report are:
- Will the implementation of the SET-Plan help to link research and innovation programmes?
- Identification of the main challenges and sub-challenges in respect of the transition of the energy system;
- Comparison of these challenges with the announced broad lines of activities under Horizon 2020;
- Assessment of the extent to which these challenges are disruptive for the assumptions or proposals of Horizon 2020;
- Identification of any adjustments to the themes in the light of this; and
- Whether any important challenges or issues are missing from the announced broad lines of activities.
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Study of FLAs in the area of Climate Action, Resource Efficiency and Raw materials

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, July 1, 2012
Abstract in English: 
The Review of Forward-looking Activities (FLAs) undertaken in recent years at national, European and international level in this area, indicates that while the H2020 proposals on climate action, resource efficiency and raw materials aim to address a highly relevant set of themes, H2020’s proposed approach and the mechanisms for implementation need to be better specified, to ensure that an effective framework for addressing the grand societal challenges is put in place.
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24
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Fostering Inclusive, Innovative and Secure European Societies

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Saturday, September 1, 2012
Abstract in English: 
The first challenge to be addressed within the current design of H2020 is how to network more closely the three analytical dimensions chosen – inclusion, security, innovations – and clarify better the different perspectives and possible readings ascribed to each of the dimensions. As an example, inclusion related to migrations don’t have just to do with people coming to Europe but also with Europeans leaving Europe, security is not just related to preventing something bad from happening it also deals with what might destroy positive dimensions like freedom of speech and privacy. When analysing the H2020 point 6 on “Inclusion, Innovation and Security” one-dimensional perspectives are much more present than multi-dimensional ones and each of the three areas is very much thought as non-networkable with the other two. Such a choice in the design of the H2020 proposal constitutes a general challenge because it might limit the possible contributions by research in social-economic sciences and humanities to the proposed objectives.
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29
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