RSS:

Newsletter subscribe:

Gas

The Future of Shale

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, January 8, 2019
Abstract in English: 
Over the last ten years, the United States has become the world’s leading producer of oil and gas, going from energy import dependence to energy dominance. This shift is due to the ability to produce from shale plays, a story which started in Texas and grew to have global ramifications. In a new report, The Future of Shale: The US Story and Its Implications, Global Energy Center Senior Fellow Ellen Scholl looks at the factors which enabled the rise of oil and gas production from shale deposits, focusing on the developments which have transpired in Texas.
This Global Energy Center report examines the Texas experience to draw lessons learned for countries hoping to utilize their shale resource potential and implications for global energy markets and geopolitics. The report concludes that the US case illustrates the challenges of operating in both a rural and an urban environment, underscores the unique advantages of the enabling ecosystem in the country, and demonstrates the importance of size and scale.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
24
Share: 

Challenges to the Future of Gas: unburnable or unaffordable?

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, December 5, 2017
Abstract in English: 
Modelling studies suggest that COP21 targets can be met with global gas demand peaking in the 2030s and declining slowly thereafter. This would qualify gas to be considered a `transition fuel’ to a low carbon economy. However, such an outcome is by no means a foregone conclusion. There are limited numbers of countries outside the OECD which can be expected to afford to pay wholesale (or import) prices of $6-8/MMbtu and above, which are needed to remunerate 2017 delivery costs of large volumes of gas from new pipeline gas or LNG projects. Prices towards the top of (and certainly above) this range are likely to make gas increasingly uncompetitive leading to progressive demand destruction even in OECD countries. The current debate in the gas community is when the `glut’ of LNG will dissipate, and the global supply/demand balance will tighten. The unspoken assumption is that when this happens – generally believed to be around the early/mid 2020s – prices will rise somewhere close to 2011-14 levels, allowing a return to profitability for projects which came on stream since the mid-2010s and allowing new projects to move forward. Should this assumption prove be correct, it will create major problems for the future of gas. The key to gas fulfilling its potential role as a transition fuel up to and beyond 2030, is that it must be delivered to high income markets below $8/MMbtu, and to low income markets below $6/MMbtu (and ideally closer to $5/MMbtu). The major challenge to the future of gas will be to ensure that it does not become (and in many low-income countries remain) unaffordable and/or uncompetitive, long before its emissions make it unburnable.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
53
Share: 

Let’s not exaggerate – Southern Gas Corridor prospects to 2030

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, July 30, 2018
Abstract in English: 
A new round of political activity to promote the Southern Gas Corridor from the Caspian to Europe has begun. In February, European energy ministers and supplier nation officials met in Baku. In June, first gas entered the Trans Anatolian Pipeline (TANAP) across Turkey, and the first substantial source of supply for the Southern Corridor, the Shah Deniz II project in Azerbaijan, started producing. Shah Deniz II will ramp up to peak output of 16 bcm/year by 2021-22. Europe will then receive around 10 bcm, no more than 2 per cent of its overall demand, via the Southern Corridor, compared to the 10-20 per cent that had been envisaged in Brussels. While political leaders continue to paint the corridor’s prospects in very bright colours, the market dynamics – in the Caspian region itself, in the Caucasus and Turkey, and in Europe – are less promising. Commercial conditions for the Southern Corridor’s success have deteriorated as political support for it has grown. This paper argues that, up to 2030, the corridor will most likely remain an insubstantial contributor to Europe’s gas balance. At best, there may be sufficient gas for a second string of TANAP, but only at the end of the 2020s. The paper considers the potential sources of supply for the Southern Corridor (Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, and others including Iran, Kurdistan, and the East Mediterranean); demand and transport issues; and the conditions under which Southern Corridor gas will compete with other supply in the European market.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
30
Share: 

Post-Vienna: Prospects for Iran's Oil Production and Exports

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, January 6, 2017
Abstract in English: 
Since the 1979 revolution, recurring rounds of sanctions and eight years of war with Iraq have hammered Iran’s oil production and export capacity. Despite boasting the fourth largest proven oil reserves in the world, Iran’s oil production and exports languished at 4 million barrels per day (mb/d) and 2.5 mb/d, respectively, in 2011.The entrance of the European Union and United States into an even more stringent sanctions regime in 2012 further crippled an already hamstrung industry. Iran’s crude exports dropped 40 percent to 1.5 mb/d in 2012 and sunk to an average of just 1 mb/d by 2014 as foreign markets closed, international investment evaporated, and supply chains withered.Now, as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action nuclear deal ushers Iran back into international energy markets, its oil and gas industry is poised to reach its full potential. The impacts promise to be profound and wide reaching as oil sales provided 80 percent of Iran’s export earnings and 60 percent of its state revenues in 2013. With Iranian oil production and exports already rising following the nuclear deal, this paper examines scenarios for Iran’s full reentry into international oil and gas markets.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
11
Share: 

Gas in the European Energy Transition: Challenges and Opportunities

Title Original Language: 
Le gaz dans la Transition Energétique Européenne: Enjeux et Opportunités
Abstract Original Language: 
Les performances environnementales du gaz lui permettent de réduire rapidement et dès maintenant les émissions de CO2 du secteur électrique quand il remplace le charbon, deux fois plus émetteur. Sa flexibilité lui permet aussi de pallier l'intermittence du solaire et de l'éolien, facilitant ainsi le développement des ENRs. Il contribue de même à un approvisionnement électrique fiable et réduit les coûts d'équilibrage du système électrique. Il pourrait aussi être utile pour réduire les émissions des transports routiers et maritimes.
Le gaz a donc toute sa place dans le futur bouquet énergétique européen, a condition de décarboner encore son usage, d'augmenter l'intégration et la compétitivité du marché gazier européen et d'assurer la sécurité d'un approvisionnement qui dépendra de plus de plus des importations extra-européennes.
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, January 15, 2018
Abstract in English: 
Thanks to its environmental performance, gas can help to quickly reduce the CO2 emissions of the electricity production when replacing the twice-as-emitting coal power. Its flexibility also help make up for the intermittence of the sun and wind powers, thus facilitating to the development of the renewable energy production. It similarly contributes to a reliable electricity supply and reduce the balancing cost of the electric system. It could also be used in the near future to reduce the emissions of the road and maritime transportation sectors.
In nutshell, gas could play a key role within the future European Energy Cluster, provided the further decarbonization of it usage, the increase in the integration and competitiveness of the European gas market, and the securing of its supply-which will increasingly depend on extra-European imports.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
90
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

Enjeux et perspectives des filières industrielles de la valorisation énergétique du sous-sol profond

Title Original Language: 
Enjeux et perspectives des filières industrielles de la valorisation énergétique du sous-sol profond
Abstract Original Language: 
Cette étude vise à établir un diagnostic quantitatif et qualitatif des acteurs implantés sur le territoire français des filières de la valorisation énergétique du sous-sol profond et de la structuration de ces filières. Ces filières comprennent l’exploration et la production pétrolières et gazières (E&P), le stockage géologique d’hydrocarbures liquides et gazeux, le stockage géologique de CO2 et la géothermie profonde. Réalisée entre mi-2014 et mi-2015, cette étude a été conduite dans une période de changements significatifs tant structurels que conjoncturels, avec notamment un retournement marqué des prix des énergies fossiles. La conjonction de ces facteurs internes et externes amène les différents acteurs des filières à promouvoir des pistes innovantes d’accompagnement pour affirmer la compétitivité et l’expertise des entreprises des filières en France et sur les marchés à l’export, tout en construisant un modèle d’exploitation responsable et durable du sous-sol profond, vectrices d’emplois sur le sol national. La France a pris des engagements énergétiques forts à moyen et long termes. Le pays prévoit notamment de réduire sa consommation d’énergie finale de 20% en 2030 et 50% en 2050 par rapport à 2012, de baisser sa consommation d’énergies fossiles de 30% en 2030 et d’augmenter la part des renouvelables à 23% en 2020 et 32% en 2030. À l’heure actuelle, les hydrocarbures assurent encore 44% de la consommation d’énergie primaire en France métropolitaine, avec une part croissante de la consommation de gaz naturel. Même si les énergies renouvelables sont en croissance, l’électricité est produite majoritairement à partir du nucléaire (74% en 2013). Le processus de transition énergétique doit être envisagé sur une longue période et l’évolution des filières énergétiques du sous-sol profond doit être repensée en synergie avec ce processus et au vu des questions de dépendance énergétique et de réindustrialisation du territoire français. Dans le contexte actuel de promotion de la transition énergétique, l’État n’intègre pas la filière de l’E&P alors qu’elle a un rôle certain à y jouer à l’horizon 2050, par exemple au travers de transferts technologiques, d’une utilisation propre des énergies fossiles ou encore du rôle du gaz naturel dans ce processus. Plus globalement, l’ensemble des filières répond à l’objectif de transition énergétique vers un mix moins carboné par l’utilisation de la géothermie profonde pour la production de chaleur et d’électricité, à l’exigence de sécurité énergétique par une exploitation des énergies fossiles raisonnée et respectueuse de l’environnement et, enfin, à la nécessité de proposer des solutions de stockage d’énergies propres pour compenser l’intermittence des énergies renouvelables. Enfin, les filières énergétiques du sous-sol profond constituent des éléments structurants du tissu industriel français et contribuent au rééquilibrage de la balance commerciale par leurs exportations. L’intérêt de maintenir le dynamisme et la compétitivité de ce tissu industriel est réel dans une optique d’attractivité globale de l’ensemble de l’industrie française et de maintien de l’emploi sur le territoire. Des filières historiques, au coeur de la politique énergétique française, tirées par des champions agissant sur la scène internationale, générant de l’emploi et un fort chiffre d’affaires principalement à l’exportation.
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, March 11, 2016
Abstract in English: 
Cette étude vise à établir un diagnostic quantitatif et qualitatif des acteurs implantés sur le territoire français des filières de la valorisation énergétique du sous-sol profond et de la structuration de ces filières. Ces filières comprennent l’exploration et la production pétrolières et gazières (E&P), le stockage géologique d’hydrocarbures liquides et gazeux, le stockage géologique de CO2 et la géothermie profonde. Réalisée entre mi-2014 et mi-2015, cette étude a été conduite dans une période de changements significatifs tant structurels que conjoncturels, avec notamment un retournement marqué des prix des énergies fossiles. La conjonction de ces facteurs internes et externes amène les différents acteurs des filières à promouvoir des pistes innovantes d’accompagnement pour affirmer la compétitivité et l’expertise des entreprises des filières en France et sur les marchés à l’export, tout en construisant un modèle d’exploitation responsable et durable du sous-sol profond, vectrices d’emplois sur le sol national. La France a pris des engagements énergétiques forts à moyen et long termes. Le pays prévoit notamment de réduire sa consommation d’énergie finale de 20% en 2030 et 50% en 2050 par rapport à 2012, de baisser sa consommation d’énergies fossiles de 30% en 2030 et d’augmenter la part des renouvelables à 23% en 2020 et 32% en 2030. À l’heure actuelle, les hydrocarbures assurent encore 44% de la consommation d’énergie primaire en France métropolitaine, avec une part croissante de la consommation de gaz naturel. Même si les énergies renouvelables sont en croissance, l’électricité est produite majoritairement à partir du nucléaire (74% en 2013). Le processus de transition énergétique doit être envisagé sur une longue période et l’évolution des filières énergétiques du sous-sol profond doit être repensée en synergie avec ce processus et au vu des questions de dépendance énergétique et de réindustrialisation du territoire français. Dans le contexte actuel de promotion de la transition énergétique, l’État n’intègre pas la filière de l’E&P alors qu’elle a un rôle certain à y jouer à l’horizon 2050, par exemple au travers de transferts technologiques, d’une utilisation propre des énergies fossiles ou encore du rôle du gaz naturel dans ce processus. Plus globalement, l’ensemble des filières répond à l’objectif de transition énergétique vers un mix moins carboné par l’utilisation de la géothermie profonde pour la production de chaleur et d’électricité, à l’exigence de sécurité énergétique par une exploitation des énergies fossiles raisonnée et respectueuse de l’environnement et, enfin, à la nécessité de proposer des solutions de stockage d’énergies propres pour compenser l’intermittence des énergies renouvelables. Enfin, les filières énergétiques du sous-sol profond constituent des éléments structurants du tissu industriel français et contribuent au rééquilibrage de la balance commerciale par leurs exportations. L’intérêt de maintenir le dynamisme et la compétitivité de ce tissu industriel est réel dans une optique d’attractivité globale de l’ensemble de l’industrie française et de maintien de l’emploi sur le territoire. Des filières historiques, au coeur de la politique énergétique française, tirées par des champions agissant sur la scène internationale, générant de l’emploi et un fort chiffre d’affaires principalement à l’exportation.
File: 
Country of publication: 
File Original Language: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
192
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

Surging Liquefied Natural Gas Trade

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Abstract in English: 
A surge in new supplies of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is about to hit the global market over the next several years. LNG export projects already under construction worldwide will add up to 175 billion cubic meters (bcm) of LNG capacity by 2020, mainly from Australia and the United States, and additional projects will move ahead as developers line up more customers.
The rise in LNG supplies will encounter substantially lower gas prices than in recent years and a slowdown in global gas demand, raising questions about the economics of LNG projects. For US exporters, liquefaction and tanker transport will add about $5.30 per million British thermal units (mbtu) in costs for LNG sent to Japan. The cost is similar to liquefy, transport, and regasify LNG sent to Europe, where the cost of regasifying LNG needs to be included to compare its price with pipeline gas.1 With average prices for LNG falling below $8 per mbtu in Japan and even lower in Europe, there is little margin for profit even with Henry Hub prices currently at about $2.40 per mbtu.2 However, LNG exporters are likely to continue selling as long as their variable costs can be covered.
For US exporters, the outlook is more favorable for companies who have concluded a final investment decision to go ahead with an LNG export project. Most of these projects are under construction and have much of their planned output already contracted to sell over twenty years. Most of the US sales will not begin until after the next two years, when demand may be stronger.
The majority of Australia’s projects will already be up and running by 2018 and therefore pose less competition for US exporters seeking to acquire new LNG customers. US projects are also ahead of proposed projects offshore East Africa and in the Eastern Mediterranean, which may not come online until after 2020.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
28
Share: 

A Post-Sanctions Iran and the Eurasian Energy Architecture

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, October 1, 2015
Abstract in English: 
The removal of international sanctions on Iran carries the potential to radically restructure the Eurasian energy architecture
and, as a consequence, reshape Eurasian geopolitics. The Euro-Atlantic community’s interests will be most impacted by Iran’s choice of export destinations for its natural gas delivered by pipeline. By defining the pattern of major energy flows through long-term supply contracts and costly pipeline infrastructure investment, the pattern of Iran’s piped gas exports in the immediate post-sanctions period will influence the development of both China’s “One Belt, One Road” (OBOR) initiative and the European
Union’s “Eastern Neighborhood” policy.
This report estimates Iran, within five years, will likely have 24.6 billion cubic meters of natural gas available for annual piped gas exports beyond its current supply commitments.
Not enough to supply all major markets, Tehran will face a crucial geopolitical choice for the destination of its piped exports. Iran will be able to export piped gas to two of the following three markets: European Union (EU)/ Turkey via the Southern Gas Corridor centering on the Trans-Anatolian Natural Gas Pipeline (TANAP), India via an Iran-Oman-India pipeline, or China via either Turkmenistan or Pakistan.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
32
Share: 
Subscribe to RSS - Gas