RSS:

Newsletter subscribe:

Governance

Trends in Artificial Intelligence and Big Data

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, January 24, 2019
Abstract in English: 
This paper addresses the present state of play and future trends, uncertainties and possible disruptions of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Big Data in the following areas:
Political: AI is biased, difficult to scrutinise and to estimate its power, and – more so when embodied in autonomous systems – potentially dangerous. Policy responses are accountability, transparency, safety and control, and public debate. These should be based on ethics. AI will lead to better governance, more debate, new policy actors and processes, a contest over centralisation, and the EU catching up. AI might progress in a revolutionary or evolutionary mode, lead to new political divisions, and change democracy. AI might be misused as a “superior orders” defence. What if data analysis changes or replaces democracy?
Socio-economic: Big Data is changing the role of data, is often dependent on sensitive information, is handicapped in the short term but better in the long term due to data protection, and its industry is in danger of monopolisation. AI lowers the cost of prediction, replaces human prediction and human labour and causes social problems, increased nudging and misuse of the term AI. AI will lead to more data, economic growth and more job market distortions. AI might lead to new industry giants, a request for more privacy, new state solutions, yet unknown jobs, AI taxes and increased state ownership. What if new economic ideologies emerge, singularity strikes or AI monopolies are broken up?
Geopolitical: AI is increasing the power competition between the US and China and gives both more power. Europe tries to create businesses and find its strengths. All are investing in military solutions and the west has a slight disadvantage here. AI will lead to a shakeup of the international system, hierarchies and networks becoming more powerful, and real-life deception being more difficult. AI might lead to China becoming the most powerful power overall and in AI. The future of AI R&D and the success of Europe’s broad approach is uncertain. What if there are two digital worlds, China becomes a data-privacy defender, and AI become targets?
Technological: Superintelligent AI is invested in and researched, challenged by philosophy, and possible this century. It might imitate the brain, be assembled together or be designed by other AIs. An intelligence explosion or a conscious AI could be possible, and might be the last invention of humanity. It would require long term funding, need to overcome many technical hurdles, be dangerous due to its intellect, possibly be contained with collective intelligence, and maybe have humans lose their jobs, safety or purpose.
Key questions for policy-makers: What makes European AI distinctive? What areas can and should we prioritise, if any? What should be regulated? How could and should the EU foster AI development, avoid monopolisation, provide data pools, use high data standards, link researchers and corporations, balance fundamental with applied AI research and private with state funding, boost applications, compensate for job loss, keep AIs away from dangerous actors, support EU foreign policy (neighbourhood, FPI, democracy and human rights, aid and development, economic freedom), improve our lives with AI, change the geopolitical AI race, deal with autonomous weapons and superintelligent AI and organise Foresight?
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
19
Share: 

Assigning responsibilities across levels of government - Trends, challenges and guidelines for policy-makers

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018
Abstract in English: 
The past decades have seen an undeniable trend towards decentralisation and greater diversity of multilevel governance arrangements around the world. Decentralisation outcomes depend on the way decentralisation is designed and implemented. A key issue for the effectiveness of decentralisation is linked to the way responsibilities are assigned across levels of government. The literature on fiscal federalism has provided some general guidelines that provide a point of departure for thinking about the assignment of responsibilities. However, when looking at country practices, the difference between theory and country experience appears to be significant. This paper reviews the trends, challenges and good practices in the way responsibilities are distributed across levels of government. It concludes with a set of guidelines for policy-makers, to better assign responsibilities across levels of government for more effective decentralisation.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
67
Share: 

Developing Effective Working Relationships Between Supreme Audit Institutions and Parliaments

Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, June 13, 2017
Abstract in English: 
Supreme audit institutions (SAIs) and parliaments are the two most important players for holding governments to account for the use of public funds. Parliaments do not usually have the capacity or expertise to scrutinise the use of public funds by the government themselves. They rely on the objective and professional view of the SAI to provide them with assurance and information about the reliability of financial reports and the use of public resources.
This paper offers guidance to Supreme Audit Institutions and parliaments for establishing effective working relationships. It describes and analyses international standards and contextual factors, as well as features and practices across Europe, and highlights key issues for effective relations and areas of Good practice. It also offers a toolkit for strengthening working relations between SAIs and parliaments.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
229
Share: 

The European Union and the Urban Dimension

Title Original Language: 
The European Union and the Urban Dimension
Abstract Original Language: 
As strategic territories for the future of countries and continents, cities and urban or rurban regions appear to be in the front line as areas of tension and as agents of intervention concerning the major challenges facing the planet. Our so-called "welfare" societies in Europe cannot escape these global processes. Initially, this report will attempt to establish a diagnosis of urban realities in Europe by exposing certain methodological difficulties and issues. In part two, it will address the theme of integrated strategies for the sustainable development of territories and ways of regulating them within cities and rurban regions. The third part will cover the role of the European Union and Member States in building the urban field. Finally, it will discuss the perspectives opened by the Europe 2020 strategy for cities and rurban regions, as well as some proposals.
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, July 1, 2012
Abstract in English: 
As strategic territories for the future of countries and continents, cities and urban or rurban regions appear to be in the front line as areas of tension and as agents of intervention concerning the major challenges facing the planet. Our so-called "welfare" societies in Europe cannot escape these global processes. Initially, this report will attempt to establish a diagnosis of urban realities in Europe by exposing certain methodological difficulties and issues. In part two, it will address the theme of integrated strategies for the sustainable development of territories and ways of regulating them within cities and rurban regions. The third part will cover the role of the European Union and Member States in building the urban field. Finally, it will discuss the perspectives opened by the Europe 2020 strategy for cities and rurban regions, as well as some proposals.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Number of pages: 
24
Country Original Language: 
Share: 

Quelle France dans 10 ans? An introduction to the governmental seminar

Title Original Language: 
Quelle France dans 10 ans? Contribution au séminaire gouvernemental
Abstract Original Language: 
Préparée en juillet-août 2013 par un groupe d’experts du CGSP, cette note a été conçue pour servir d’introduction au séminaire gouvernemental du 19 août 2013.
Elle propose des éléments de constat et des pistes de réflexion sur les perspectives à horizon de dix ans et esquisse une approche pour l’élaboration d’une stratégie à moyen terme, mais ne prétend ni faire un inventaire des questions, ni fixer les termes d’une réponse. Son objectif principal est d’ouvrir une discussion.

En 1985, Jean-Pierre Chevènement, alors ministre de l’Éducation nationale, lance l’objectif d’amener avant l’an 2000 80 % d’une classe d’âge au niveau du baccalauréat. La proportion de bacheliers stagne alors depuis plusieurs années en dessous de 30 %. Dix ans plus tard, en 1995, elle dépasse 60 %. Il y a, bien sûr, matière à critiquer les effets collatéraux d’une mutation aussi rapide. Mais le pays, qui compte 500 000 étudiants de plus, a commencé de combler son retard éducatif. L’accès aux études supérieures ne sera plus l’apanage d’une minorité. L’objectif était clair et mobilisateur ; l’action a porté ses fruits.

Notre histoire récente offre d’autres exemples de même type : plan d’équipement télécoms et programme d’indépendance énergétique dans les années 1970 ; mise en place de la monnaie européenne dans les années 1990 ; processus de Bologne sur l’harmonisation des systèmes universitaires européens ou plan cancer dans les années 2000. À chaque fois un objectif lointain a été fixé, qui paraissait souvent irréaliste lorsqu’il a été formulé. Il a orienté l’action publique, guidé les anticipations et catalysé les énergies. Quoi qu’on pense de ces entreprises, aussi critique qu’on puisse être à l’égard des effets indésirables de telle ou telle d’entre elles, force est de reconnaître leur ambition et l’ampleur des changements qu’elles ont entraînés.

Autour de nous plusieurs pays avancés ont, en une décennie, réalisé des transformations de grande ampleur. L’Allemagne de Gerhard Schröder vient immédiatement à l’esprit : en mars 2003, au moment où le chancelier présente son programme de réformes, le pays fait figure d’homme malade de l’Europe. Dix ans après les inégalités de revenu se sont accrues, mais le chômage est à son plus bas et la prospérité économique du pays est insolente. On peut citer aussi la Suède, où la crise financière du début des années 1990 a été l’occasion d’un réexamen qui a préservé les fondements du modèle social tout en redéfinissant ses modalités d’application. Sa réussite est particulièrement frappante en comparaison de l’évolution du Japon, qui a lui aussi subi une crise financière violente au début des années 1990, mais n’a pas su prendre ses difficultés à bras-le-corps (voir Annexe). On peut enfin mentionner, dans le domaine international, les Objectifs de développement du millénaire. Dans un contexte économique, il est vrai, favorable, ces objectifs ont permis de concentrer les efforts et nombre d’entre eux sont en passe d’être atteints dès avant l’échéance de 2015.

Tous ces exemples montrent qu’à condition de viser loin et de se fixer des objectifs clairs, l’action publique n’a pas perdu sa capacité transformatrice. Dix ans, c’est le bon horizon pour des décisions structurantes qui :

■éclairent l’avenir ;
■donnent continuité à l’action publique par-delà les alternances politiques ;
■permettent de sortir de la logique paramétrique – combien en plus, combien en moins – pour mettre l’accent sur des changements qualitatifs ;
■conduisent à raisonner sur les stocks – de compétences, d’équipements, de logements, de dette – qui déterminent le bien-être d’une nation, et plus seulement sur les flux ;
■amènent les institutions à se réformer pour servir les objectifs qui leur ont été assignés.
Cinq ans, c’est l’horizon du politique mais dix ans, c’est celui de la société. La perspective décennale est à la fois assez rapprochée pour mobiliser les énergies d’une collectivité autour de l’avenir qu’elle veut se construire, et assez éloignée pour que les investissements institutionnels ou matériels destinés à y conduire portent leurs fruits. Pour les mêmes raisons, elle est propice à la délibération et à la concertation.

Notre société, cependant, a depuis plusieurs années une vision brouillée de son avenir. C’est un handicap, car l’absence d’une perspective commune dans laquelle nos concitoyens se reconnaissent et puissent se projeter affaiblit le collectif et favorise les comportements de chacun-pour-soi. C’est aussi une source d’interrogations pour nos partenaires et les observateurs internationaux qui ne comprennent plus bien à quoi notre pays aspire et ne discernent plus quels moyens il se donne pour atteindre ses objectifs.

Réfléchir à ce que nous voulons être dans dix ans, en débattre, fixer sur cette base des orientations, et engager les actions correspondantes peut aider à remobiliser un pays aujourd’hui désorienté. La France de 2013 n’est plus celle des années 1970 ou même des années 1990. Les urgences et les priorités ne sont plus les mêmes. L’État n’est plus en situation de décider pour la société dans son ensemble. Mais répondre aux questions qui se posent à nous demande toujours continuité et cohérence. La valeur de la méthode demeure.

Dans cette perspective, la présente note est organisée en trois parties. La première fournit un cadrage prospectif sommaire sur le monde, l’Europe et la France à horizon de dix ans. La deuxième met l’accent sur trois choix collectifs d’importance pour la société française. La troisième offre des éléments de méthode et des points de repère pour l’élaboration d’une stratégie à dix ans.

Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Monday, August 19, 2013
Abstract in English: 
This briefing paper has been designed as an introduction to the governmental seminar held on August 19th, 2013. It was prepared during July-August 2013 by a group of experts from the CGSP. It includes comments and ideas for discussion concerning a ten-year horizon and sketches out an approach for developing a medium-term strategy, without in any way claiming to raise all the questions or provide suitable answers. Its principal aim is to initiate discussion on the agenda.

Thinking and debating about what the French people wish to be ten years from now, fixing the roadmap ahead on the basis of such discussion, and implementing the actions to be taken will enable the country to come out from its current confusion. France in 2013 is not the France of the 1970s, nor even that of the 1990s. The priorities and urgencies of today are not the same as they were. The State is no longer able to decide for society as a whole. Continuity and consistency are essential to address the issues to be tackled, and adopting a rigorous method will be extremely worthwhile. In this context, the current briefing paper is divided into three sections. The first provides a brief snapshot of the world, of Europe, and of France in the next ten years. The second dwells on three key collective choices that are particularly important for French society. The third suggests methodological elements and some reference points as an aid to producing a ten-year strategy.
File: 
Country of publication: 
Cover page image: 
Country Original Language: 
Share: 
Topics: 
Subscribe to RSS - Governance