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Innovation

Incentivizing responsible and secure innovation Principles and guidance for investors

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, July 3, 2019
Abstract in English: 
This report proposes an innovative focus on cybersecurity incentives for the investment community. Investors in innovation and technology-driven companies have a responsibility to ensure that cybersecurity is given priority in the early stages of product development. By ensuring cybersecurity from the outset – including features like security-by-design and security-by-default – investors can increase the likelihood of company success in the long term, promote more durable technology and improve overall cyber resilience. This report proposes principles for investors that will raise their internal cybersecurity awareness and offers a complete framework enabling investors to assess the cybersecurity preparedness of their target company.
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Top 10 Emerging Technologies 2019

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, July 2, 2019
Abstract in English: 
The technologies on the list, which is curated by members of the Forum’s Expert Network, are selected against a number of criteria. In addition to promising major benefits to societies and economies, they must also be disruptive, attractive to investors and researchers, and expected to have achieved considerable scale within five years. “From income inequality to climate change, technology will play a critical role in finding solutions to many of the challenges our world faces today. This year’s emerging technologies demonstrate the rapid pace of human innovation and offer a glimpse into what a sustainable, inclusive future will look like,” said Jeremy Jurgens, Chief Technology Officer at the World Economic Forum. “Technologies that are emerging today will soon be shaping the world tomorrow and well into the future – with impacts to economies and to society at large. Now that we are well into the Fourth Industrial Revolution, it’s critical that we discuss and ensure that humanity is served by these new innovations so that we can continue to prosper,” said Mariette DiChristina, Editor-in-Chief of Scientific American, and chair of the Emerging Technologies Steering Committee.
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A New Circular Vision for Electronics, Time for a Global Reboot

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, January 24, 2019
Abstract in English: 
Rapid innovation and lowering costs have dramatically increased access to electronic products and digital technology, with many benefits. This has led to an increase in the use of electronic devices and equipment. The unintended consequence of this is a steep growth of electronic and electrical waste: e-waste. E-waste is now the fastest-growing waste stream in the world. It is estimated this waste stream reached 48.5 million tonnes in 2018. Globally, society only deals with 20% of e-waste appropriately and there is little data on what happens to the rest, which for the most part ends up in landfill, or is disposed of by informal workers in poor conditions. Yet e-waste is worth at least $62.5 billion annually, which is more than the gross domestic product (GDP) of most countries. Changes in technology such as cloud computing and the internet of things (IoT) could hold the potential to “dematerialize” the electronics industry. The rise of service business models and better product tracking and takeback could lead to global circular value chains. Material efficiency, recycling infrastructure and scaling up the volume and quality of recycled materials to meet the needs of electronics supply chains will all be essential. If the sector is supported with the right policy mix and managed in the right way, it could lead to the creation of millions of decent jobs worldwide. A new vision for the production and consumption of electronic and electrical goods based on the circular economy is needed. It is easy for e-waste to be framed as a post-consumer problem, but the issue encompasses the lifecycle of the devices everyone uses. Designers, manufacturers, investors, traders, miners, raw material producers, consumers, policy-makers and others have a crucial role to play in reducing waste, retaining value within the system, extending the economic and physical life of an item, as well as its ability to be repaired, recycled and reused.
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EIB Working Papers 2018/07 - Young SMEs: Driving Innovation in Europe?

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Friday, September 21, 2018
Abstract in English: 
Using large scale EIB Investment Survey evidence for 2016 covering 8,900 non-financial firms from all size and age classes across all sectors and all EU Member States, we identify different innovation profiles based on a firm’s R&D investment and/or innovation activities. We find that “basic” firms – i.e. firms that do not engage in any type of R&D or innovation – are more common among young SMEs, while innovators –i.e. firms that do R&D and introduce new products, processes or services- are more often old and large firms. This hold particularly for “leading innovators”, ie those introducing innovations new to the market. To further explore why young SMEs are not more active in innovation, we explore their access to finance. We confirm that young small leading innovators are the most likely to be credit constrained. Grants seem to at least partly addressing the external financing access problem for leading innovators, but not for young SMEs.
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Number of pages: 
26
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Mutations économiques du secteur de l’industrie des métaux non ferreux

Title Original Language: 
Mutations économiques du secteur de l’industrie des métaux non ferreux
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015
Abstract in English: 
Le secteur des métaux non ferreux est un fournisseur incontournable d’autres secteurs majeurs de l’industrie française. Par les innovations technologiques qu’il porte, il met également à disposition de ces secteurs aval des solutions innovantes et apparaît ainsi comme un maillon essentiel de la chaîne industrielle. Les métaux non ferreux, qu’il s’agisse des métaux traditionnels ou à haute intensité technologiques (dits high-tech), trouvent leurs applications dans de nombreux secteurs industriels comme les matériels de transport, le bâtiment, l'aéronautique, l'automobile, les matériels électriques et électroniques, les équipements domestiques et emballages ou encore les industries mécaniques. Plus particulièrement, l’utilisation des métaux high-tech (ou les alliages utilisant ces métaux) permet d’induire des caractéristiques mécaniques et physico-chimiques propices aux innovations technologiques et aux technologies de rupture. L’industrie française des métaux non ferreux a connu, durant cette dernière décennie, des évolutions marquantes de ses marchés et un contexte concurrentiel mondial renforcé qui ont conduit à de profondes recompositions de son appareil productif. Au niveau mondial, le déplacement du centre de gravité de la croissance économique vers les pays émergents et le ralentissement de la croissance de la demande lié à la crise économique ont engendré, en France et en Europe, une baisse d’activité de la quasi-totalité des secteurs consommateurs de métaux non ferreux. L’analyse prospective à l’horizon de 15-20 ans fait ressortir différents facteurs qui devraient agir sur les marchés des métaux non ferreux. En termes de volumes, les applications dans les infrastructures bénéficieront d’une croissance rapide dans les pays émergents, alors que dans les pays matures, les marchés reposeront davantage sur des remplacements, des améliorations, des adaptations à de nouveaux modes de consommation et production, avec une croissance plus faible. Concernant les biens de consommation et d’équipement des ménages, tels que l’automobile, la croissance mondiale en volume sera principalement tirée par les pays émergents. Dans les pays matures, les facteurs de croissance dépendront notamment des réponses et solutions qui pourront être apportées aux besoins de nouveaux modes de consommation et de production, tels que l’optimisation et l’efficacité des matériaux, les développements technologiques combinés à la montée en puissance des technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC), ou encore la capacité de satisfaire aux exigences environnementales. Les acteurs français disposent d’atouts et de potentialités pour réaliser des productions à haute intensité technologique et à forte valeur ajoutée. Le défi pour les acteurs français est alors d’acquérir ou de confirmer un avantage compétitif par rapport à des concurrents, y compris issus de pays émergents, prompts à progresser sur une courbe d’expérience comparable et à rivaliser sur des créneaux identiques. Dans le domaine des métaux non ferreux, la diffusion de nouvelles technologies et/ou de nouveaux matériaux bénéficie du rôle actif de quelques donneurs d’ordres, acteurs institutionnels et centres techniques. Globalement, les projets et les initiatives émergent en ordre dispersé, et une meilleure coordination au niveau national serait souhaitable. De nombreux métaux non ferreux (cuivre, aluminium, métaux précieux et high-tech) bénéficient de l’apport des TIC, et notamment de l’électronique embarquée, tous types de véhicules confondus (aéronefs, trains, automobiles, etc.).
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232
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Germany 2030: Germany's Prosperity Rests on Innovation

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Abstract in English: 
In the coming years, prosperity in Germany will have to be generated through technology and knowledge to an increasing degree. Technological progress will become the sole driver of growth in the long run as growth contributed by labour and capital declines in the face of demographic change.
Germany must now chart the course for this transformation.

Radical technological change will slash marginal costs, opening up completely new business models. This will change value added in key sectors including mobility, healthcare and energy, and increase integration with services.

Germany must take more concerted action than it has so far to set the course for industrial policy going forward. Although Germany still boasts a range of outstanding benefits as a business location, it must tackle weak points in the start-up environment, venture capital, public investment and regulatory parameters for key technologies.

The strategic priorities of German industrial policy must continue to be the deepening of the European single market and the international trade and investment regime. Bilateral and multilateral trade policy has moved into rougher waters while the untapped potential right here in the European Union
is wholly underestimated.

In the digital world too, a good balance must be found between productivity and social cohesion. While this vision is still forming on the horizon, the political course taken now will determine whether it will turn into a positive or a plaintive reality.
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40
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The European Union and the Urban Dimension

Title Original Language: 
The European Union and the Urban Dimension
Abstract Original Language: 
As strategic territories for the future of countries and continents, cities and urban or rurban regions appear to be in the front line as areas of tension and as agents of intervention concerning the major challenges facing the planet. Our so-called "welfare" societies in Europe cannot escape these global processes. Initially, this report will attempt to establish a diagnosis of urban realities in Europe by exposing certain methodological difficulties and issues. In part two, it will address the theme of integrated strategies for the sustainable development of territories and ways of regulating them within cities and rurban regions. The third part will cover the role of the European Union and Member States in building the urban field. Finally, it will discuss the perspectives opened by the Europe 2020 strategy for cities and rurban regions, as well as some proposals.
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, July 1, 2012
Abstract in English: 
As strategic territories for the future of countries and continents, cities and urban or rurban regions appear to be in the front line as areas of tension and as agents of intervention concerning the major challenges facing the planet. Our so-called "welfare" societies in Europe cannot escape these global processes. Initially, this report will attempt to establish a diagnosis of urban realities in Europe by exposing certain methodological difficulties and issues. In part two, it will address the theme of integrated strategies for the sustainable development of territories and ways of regulating them within cities and rurban regions. The third part will cover the role of the European Union and Member States in building the urban field. Finally, it will discuss the perspectives opened by the Europe 2020 strategy for cities and rurban regions, as well as some proposals.
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24
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One principle and seven goals for innovation

Title Original Language: 
Un principe et sept ambitions pour l'innovation
Abstract Original Language: 
Installée par le Président de la République le 18 avril dernier, la Commission a pour objectif de définir des ambitions d'innovations devant conduire à des activités créatrices de richesses et d'emplois. L'innovation est indispensable pour que la France, dans dix ans, soit dans la course mondiale et conserve son niveau de vie et son modèle social. Le rapport présente sept ambitions pour la France sur le plan technologique et industriel à l'horizon 2030 : le stockage de l'énergie, le recyclage des matières, la valorisation des richesses marines, les protéines végétales, la médecine individualisée, la silver economy (l'économie des seniors) et la valorisation des données massives (Big Data).
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2013
Abstract in English: 
Innovation is essential for France to be in the global competition in ten years, and maintain its standard of living and social model. The report outlines seven technological and industrial goals for France for 2030: energy storage, recycling of materials, the promotion of marine resources, green proteins, individualized medicine, silver economy and promotion of massive data (Big data).
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60
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Which France in Ten Years? Establishing the Foundations of the Coming Decade

Title Original Language: 
Quelle France dans dix ans? Les chantiers de la décennie
Abstract Original Language: 
France Stratégie a élaboré une analyse des enjeux essentiels auxquels la société française doit répondre et de leurs implications et avance pour les dix années à venir une série d’orientations prioritaires.
Le présent rapport soumet ces analyses et propositions au débat social et citoyen et à la décision politique.
Original Language: 
Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Sunday, June 1, 2014
Abstract in English: 
This report begins by outlining the major developments of the next ten years at the international level and assesses what targets France can realistically aim at. The second part consists of a diagnosis of the state of the country, an analysis of the reform strategies that have been implemented and a reflexion upon the main challenges that France is faced with. The report goes on to focus on eight topics, offering possible orientations for the coming decade. Finally, a strategy is outlined on the basis of the conclusions of the analysis.
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Advancing Manufacturing Advancing Europe

Date of Editorial Board meeting: 
Publication date: 
Thursday, May 15, 2014
Abstract in English: 
Manufacturing is the most important source of economic development and growth. The economic importance of manufacturing goes far beyond its contribution to GDP, for which the European Commission has put forward a target of 20 %. The manufacturing industry in the EU is worth € 7.000 billion in turnover and it accounts for 80% of the total EU exports and 80 % of the private R&D expenditure. Moreover, it provides jobs for 30 million employees directly and is the source for twice as many jobs indirectly, the vast majority in small or medium-sized enterprises. To maintain its importance the industry in Europe needs modernisation. Last year the contribution of manufacturing to EU GDP has declined to 15.1 %. To be able to reverse this trend and start an Industrial Renaissance in Europe, we need more investment in innovation, resource efficiency, new technologies and skills. In the conclusions of the European Council of 20-21 March 2014, the Heads of State and Government underlined that industrial competitiveness should be at the centre of policy-making at all levels. It is an important signal for both the public and the business sector, to which they should respond with specific measures facilitating the industrial change. That’s why advanced manufacturing is one of the six priority areas for the modernisation of industry in the European Union. The market uptake of advanced manufacturing and clean technologies can improve productivity, resource efficiency and competitiveness in any manufacturing sector. To speed up this process a dedicated Task Force on Advanced Manufacturing for Clean Production was created in 2013. One year after its creation, the Task Force has drawn up a set of targeted actions aimed at advancing the European industry. In order to give Europe a competitive lead in the new industrial revolution, we need to engage in a partnership between the European Commission, Member States and industry. Europe needs industry and industry needs Europe. Get prepared for the future of manufacturing!
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